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Join us at Laurier

Becoming a Golden Hawk means more than just cheering on our (really good) varsity teams – it means being a student who cares about your community, who works hard in the classroom, and who takes advantage of all the learning opportunities that can happen outside the classroom, too.


Courses generally run two hours per week for six consecutive weeks and are offered in morning or afternoon sessions. LALL offers courses three times a year:

  • Spring semester: usually runs early April to mid-May.
  • Fall semester: usually runs mid-October to end of November.
  • Winter semester: usually runs end of January to mid-March (no classes held during the university's reading week).

Note: Your instructor may recommend additional items for purchases (e.g. books). These are only recommendations and are not mandatory for participation in the course.

Brantford Course Offerings for Spring 2019

Music History: Romantic Era

  • Dates: Mondays, April 15 to April 29
  • Location: Brantford Campus, Grand River Hall, GRH 101
  • Time: 1:00–2:50 p.m. 
  • Cost: $45.00

Course Description

This three week course explores the life, musical contributions and compositions of several important composers from the Romantic Era. This includes a study of stylistic features of Romantic music and the influence of other art forms on music. The class will offer an opportunity to listen to and discuss music excerpts from various compositions.

Instructor

Stephanie Burgoyne holds a PhD. in mathematics (University of Western Ontario), a Bachelor of Education degree (University of New Brunswick) and an Artist Diploma in Performance (University of Western Ontario). She is a part-time instructor at Wilfrid Laurier University, Brantford campus, where she teaches courses in business mathematics and statistics as well as courses in Youth and Children’s Studies. She has participated in various interdisciplinary research projects at the Brantford campus. Stephanie also enjoys serving her church and community through piano/organ accompaniment and choir direction.

“Starting a Side Hustle”

  • Dates: Thursdays, April 11 to May 16
  • Location: Brantford Campus, Carnegie Building, CB207
  • Time: 10:00–11:50 a.m. 
  • Cost: $85.00

Course Description

Explore how to turn your passion, interests, or hobbies into a money making opportunity. Learn how to be a side entrepreneur and pursue an idea that you've always wanted to. In this course, we will examine what is meaningful to you and use a process to develop from an idea to opportunity.

Instructor

John Lam is an entrepreneur and startup business coach. He currently acts as the Program Coordinator for Wilfrid Laurier University's LaunchPad Incubator where entrepreneurs receive support to grow their ideas. John Lam also teaches entrepreneurship courses for Wilfrid Laurier University as a faculty member.

Waterloo Course Offerings for Spring 2019 

Canada's War: 1938-1944

  • Dates: Mondays, April 8 to May 13
  • Location: Waterloo Campus, 202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 10 a.m. – 11:50 a.m. 
  • Cost: $85

Course Description

This year 2019 marks the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of war in 1939 and the 75th anniversary of D-Day and the campaign to liberate western Europe, a time to reflect on the role Canada played in the Second World War. This course of lectures will encourage discussion of key issues beginning with the background to war in 1938-1939. We will look at the reaction to "Munich," the agreement that appeased Hitler by sacrificing Czechoslovakia and the impact of kristallnacht the November 1938 attack on the Jews of Germany. Canada played no part in the events that followed but public opinion was firmly on the side of the Anglo-French declaration of war. As Canada mobilised, eventually enlisting one million men and women out of a population of eleven million, the army was called upon to participate in two desperate ventures, the defence of Hong Kong and the raid on Dieppe. Both events will be examined in lecture-discussion "decision-making" exercises. The contributions of the Royal Canadian Air Force in the bombing offensive and the Royal Canadian Navy in the Battle of the Atlantic were of vital importance and will be studied in their strategic context. The important Italian campaign which lasted from July 43 to the end of the war will be described in a case study approach to the assault on the Winter Line, December 1943, especially at Ortona. The preparations for Operation "Overlord" and the D-Day landings at Juno and Omaha will be followed by a close look at the Canadians in Normandy. We will conclude with the largest joint and combined air-naval-army operation ever carried out under Canadian command the struggle to clear the approaches to the Port of Antwerp, October 1944.

Instructor

Terry Copp is Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at Laurier and is the author co-author of numerous books and articles on labour, social and military history including Fields of Fire The Canadians in Normandy. Copp is an experienced and highly regarded lecturer who has gained international recognition for his research and leadership of battlefield study tours.

Reformation Europe: Looking Back 500 Years Later

  • Dates: Mondays, April 8 to May 13
  • Location: Waterloo Campus, 202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 1 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
  • Cost: $85

Course Description

Driven by the 500th anniversary of the start of the Reformation in 1517, the past few years have witnessed a number of books and events, celebrations and reflections focused on assessing the causes and legacies of the European Reformations. Inspired by that, this course explores many of the causes, developments, and impacts that have come to define this important moment in history. This includes examining the religious debates, political motivations, and social and cultural conditions, that shaped – and were shaped by – this era.

Week 1: Introduction: Reform before the Reformation

  • Medieval reform movements by churchmen and lay people
  • Impact of Renaissance Humanism

Week 2: Martin Luther – medieval or modern

  • Luther's life and career
  • Luther's ideas
  • Emergence of a 'Lutheran' church

Week 3: The Reformation spreads

  • The German Peasants' War and a divided empire
  • The Reformation comes to England under Henry VIII
  • Proliferation of Protestantisms

Week 4: The Catholic 'response'

  • 'Catholic Reform' vs 'Counter Reform'
  • The Council of Trent
  • New orders and new aesthetics

Week 5: Conflict and Co-existence

  • The French Wars of Religion and the Edict of Nantes
  • The Dutch Revolt in the Low Countries and beyond
  • Political settlements and religious pluralism

Week 6: Conclusions and Legacies

  • The Reformation from a global perspective
  • The Reformation from a modern perspective

Instructor

Dr. Nicholas Must earned both his BA and MA in History at Wilfrid Laurier University before completing his PhD at McMaster University. He has taught in the History and Medieval Studies departments at Laurier. His research interests are focused on early modern history, and especially on religious pluralism in the pre-modern world. Dr. Must's book, Preaching a Dual Identity: Huguenot Sermons and the Shaping of Confessional Identity, 1629-1685, was published in 2017, and it studies how sermons served both religious and political purposes in shaping the Huguenot population of France as a religious minority.

Digging Deep: “Tales of the Dead and Gone”

  • Dates: Tuesdays, April 9 to May 14
  • Location: Waterloo Campus, 202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 10 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
  • Cost: $85

Course Description

Cemeteries: mysterious repositories of the forgotten, the renowned, and the infamous. We pass them every day on our way to work. Sometimes they make us shudder and other times we pass without a second thought. But, did you know that cemeteries often hold the keys to the past in a way that written records may not? Grave markers replete with birth dates, death dates, epidemics and plagues... Sometimes a poem, and other times, works of art. Some graves are marked and others, more elusive, are not. What does this mean for the researcher? Come find out. We know where the bodies are buried (and what they can tell us from their final resting place). Waterloo Region is full of them!

Instructor

Joanna Rickert-Hall is a social historian engaged in the unending search for arcane and overlooked histories — particularly those that involve folk medicine, magic, and early community relationships in Waterloo Region. When not teaching or researching elsewhere, you may find her baking bread over an open fire, making traditional Mennonite foods or just telling stories.

Introduction to Cosmology

  • Dates: Tuesdays, April 9 to April 23
  • Location: Waterloo Campus, 202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 1 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
  • Cost: $45

Course Description

This course is a non technical elementary introduction to the modern understanding of cosmology, intended for non-science students. It will contain an overview in cosmology and its history, Olber's and Boltzman's paradox, heat death, space-time and shape of the universe, modern theories, cosmological inflation, and cosmological constant.

Instructor

Ioannis Haranas received his PhD in Astrophysics and Space Science and MSc in Astronomy and Astrophysics from York University in Toronto, and completed my MSc in Solid State Physics from Brock University in St. Catharines. He is also a team research associate, for East Carolina University, Department of Mathematics, and a Research Collaborator, University of Patras Department of Mathematics, and research collaborator at the Universitat Politècnica de València, Department of Applied Mathematics (DMA). Cosmology and General Relativity Group, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Computer Algebra of Ontario at Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Canada, APM Institute for the Advancement of Physics and Mathematics, Athens, Greece.

Discovering The Ancient World

  • Dates: Wednesdays, April 10 to May 15
  • Location: Waterloo Campus, 202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 10 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
  • Cost: $85

Course Description

Many of us grew up learning about the "glory that was Greece" and the "grandeur that was Rome.” But beyond the horizons of Greco-Roman civilization, there are far more wonders than our younger selves ever imagined. This course will explore the great disasters that reshaped the ancient world, introduce you to ancient peoples who farmed the Sahara, and investigate the origins of the great trade routes that would become the Silk Road. You will learn about Bronze Age cities with flush toilets, long-lost ancient cities of the New World as old as the cities of Sumeria, the truth behind the legend of the Amazons, and much more.

Instructor

Alicia McKenzie has taught courses in history and medieval studies at Laurier since 2008. She did her graduate work at the University of Toronto, where she focused on the fall of the Roman Empire and the social history of late antiquity. At Laurier, she has taught various courses on the ancient and medieval world, as well as courses on medievalism (how the Middle Ages are reflected in contemporary culture).

Climate Change: Your role in Changing the Future of Planet Earth

  • Dates: Wednesdays, April 10 to May 15
  • Location: Waterloo Campus, 202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 1 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
  • Cost: $85

Course Description

Climate change is one of the biggest issues in today’s world and a large threat to not only our planet, but also humanity. But what is climate change? It is important for us to understand what climate change is in order for us to fight it and slow it down.

In this multidisciplinary course, we will explore climate change and sustainability on multiple fronts that include the global stage, in Canada, in Ontario and on the local municipality level. Topics we will cover will include climate change, sustainability, energy, water, health, sustainable travel, healthy and sustainable food, waste and material footprint, biodiversity and nature.

In this course we will explore not only these topics on climate change and sustainability, but also emphasize through discussions what you as global citizens can do to have an impact on slowing down climate change and making a real difference.

Instructor

Marcia Chaudet is an Educational Developer in Teaching and Learning here at Wilfrid Laurier University and supports Laurier students with their teaching development. She is also a sessional instructor at the University of Guelph and the University of Waterloo and has taught a range of biology and science undergraduate courses. She received her PhD in Science from the University of Waterloo and focused her research on the structural studies of enzymes involved in sugar digestion. Through her research and teachings in the sciences she strives to invoke student’s sense of curiosity in science and question the biology of the world.

Lilith and Eve: The Western Making of Sex and Shame

  • Dates: Thursdays, April 11 to May 16
  • Location: Waterloo Campus202 Regina St. N., R126
  • Time: 10 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
  • Cost: $85

Course Description

This course will use the Abrahamic creation myth as a frame for understanding how sex (meaning both the division of the human species and sexual intercourse) has been constructed and regulated in Judaism (both biblical and rabbinic), Christianity (New Testament, medieval and contemporary), and Islam (Quranic and medieval). Based on this story, sex in Judaism has been constructed as natural (not sinful), with an emphasis on procreation (“be fruitful and multiply”). However, the same story has been interpreted in Christianity very differently, connecting sex with shame, and even Satan (who, in the Christian interpretation, shows up in the garden as the serpent). In particular, Augustine’s interpretation of this story in the 5th century CE has definitively influenced western thought on the connection of sex and sin so much so that for most of Christian history the only “good sex” was that which occurred in a heterosexual marriage for the purposes of procreation. Further, we will examine how these religious traditions have used the “two” women in the Garden of Eden (Lilith and Eve) to code ideal femininity as weak, subordinate, motherly and domestic, and characterized women who do not follow these traditional gender roles as temptresses, witches and demons. For its part, Islam contains similarities and differences in its narratives of creation and the “Fall,” and we will consider how these stories have provided a basis to link Eve with lust and evil.

Instructor

Brent Hagerman lives in Waterloo, Ontario where he teaches courses in communication studies, popular music, and religion and culture at Wilfrid Laurier University. He grew up in Bermuda where he fell in love with the ska, reggae and dancehall musical traditions of Jamaica and his research reflects this, focusing on discourses of religion, race, sexuality and masculinity in Caribbean popular music. He has published several academic articles on Rastafari and reggae, and the popular book, Bob Marley FAQ, with Backbeat Books (2018). He has worked as a music journalist, edited an alternative weekly, spent time on the road with dancehall reggae legend Yellowman, busked around the U.K., volunteered at a peace and reconciliation centre in Northern Ireland, nearly learned to play the sitar in India, and released two records with his scrappy ska-reggae band, the Baudelaires, on Busted Flat Records. He can often be found at local music venues, record stores, and making pilgrimages to venerated sites in rock and reggae history.

Contact Us:

E: lall@wlu.ca
T: 519.884.0710 x6036
Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - noon, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.

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