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Being a Golden Hawk means more than just cheering on our (really good) varsity teams – it means being a student who cares about your community, who works hard in the classroom, and who takes advantage of all the learning opportunities that can happen outside the classroom, too.


Courses generally run two hours per week for six consecutive weeks and are offered in morning or afternoon sessions. LALL offers courses three times a year:

  • Spring semester: usually runs the second week of April through the third week of May.
  • Fall semester: usually runs the second week of October through the third week of November.
  • Winter semester: usually runs the first week of February through the middle of March.

Note: Your instructor may recommend additional items for purchases (e.g. books). These are only recommendations and are not mandatory for participation in the course.

Waterloo Course Offerings for Spring 2017

The World of Birds

  • Dates: Mondays, from April 3 to May 8
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:20 p.m.

A course designed to look at the world of birds. This is not a bird watching course, rather a course designed to begin to understand bird behaviours and how birds interact and affect our lives and the lives of other organisms on earth. We will look at the structure of birds, how their behaviours maximize their chances of survival. We will look at how birds fit into their environment and how they exploit that environment successfully.

Instructor

David Lamble was a high school chemistry teacher for 35 years prior to his retirement. Beginning in 1978, David began a banding study of Tree Swallows. His interest in birds expanded to include all species found in Southern Ontario. By 1986, he was a Master bander – one of only 100 in Canada. His major studies have now expanded to include Bobolinks, Snow Buntings, Ducks as well as his favourite bird – the Tree Swallow. Since 1978, he has banded 175 000 birds of 185 species.

Seeking out the Sacred: Pilgrimage in Pre-Modern Christianity

  • Dates: Wednesdays, April 12 to May 17
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 9:30 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.

This course is examines the various ways in which the pilgrimage was interwoven throughout society and culture from the late-antique period to the early-modern. Pilgrimage is a window into many key elements of medieval society and religion, and into the public and private lives of medieval people, while it also created its own indelible mark on the medieval landscape and psyche. Exploring the historical development of pilgrimage as well as key sites, routes, and debates, this course will show that pilgrimages could be both extraordinary and mundane, and that pilgrimage was not a discrete part of medieval culture, but a central and integral feature that greatly influenced individuals and institutions.

Instructor

Nicholas Must earned both his BA and MA in History at Laurier before going to McMaster University to complete his PhD. He has taught in both the History and Medieval Studies departments here at Laurier. His research interests are focused on early modern French Protestantism and, more generally, on the study of religious culture and religious pluralism in the pre-modern world.

Can Grisly be Good? Redefining the Archaeology of Disaster

  • Dates: Wednesdays, April 5 to May 10
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:20 p.m.

There has long been a fascination with archaeological sites that were impacted by disasters. Pompeii, devastated by a volcanic eruption in AD 79, is the preeminent example. Archaeology has been inconsistent in its treatment of disaster sites, however, and many issues like the impact and significance of these events are poorly understood or exaggerated. The aim of this course will be to explore what archaeology of disaster could and should entail. We will take a global perspective in exploring issues related to investigating ancient disaster sites. The archaeology of modern disasters will also be considered in an effort to gain a comprehensive understanding of the information these sites can provide.

Instructor

Scott Gallimore is an assistant professor in the Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies at Laurier. He is a Roman archaeologist who has worked on numerous archaeological projects in different parts of Greece. Along with investigating ancient disasters, he also conducts research on ancient landscapes and the economic history of the Roman Empire. Assistant Professor Gallimore is also a recipient of the 2017 Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance Award for Excellence in Teaching.

An Introduction to Death and Dying

  • Dates: Wednesdays, April 5 to May 10
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

Resurrected by popular demand, this course will explore a number of key historical, cultural, and philosophical issues related to mortality, dying, and death. Participants will be invited to read a combination of scholarly and popular sources on topics such as the physiology of death, the role of hospice and palliative care, medical assistance in dying, cultural-religious approaches to mortality, diverse funeral practices, and the complex relationship between death and hope. Supplementary materials will be presented in class and/or online (e.g. poetry, music and artwork). Throughout the course, the instructor will welcome input and experiences from participants, recognizing that some have had very few encounters with death, while for others, death feels like very familiar terrain.

Instructor

Matthew Bailey-Dick is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto (Adult Education and Community Development), a sessional instructor in the Peace and Conflict Studies program at Conrad Grebel University College, a hospice volunteer, and a part-time funeral celebrant. In prior years, he worked as a peace educator with Mennonite Central Committee Ontario and served in pastoral roles in two Mennonite congregations.

The Pacific War

  • Dates: Wednesdays, April 5 to May 10
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 3:30 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.

WWII is often depicted as a conflict between the pure good and the pure evil. In Asia, the history of WWII is much more nuanced. In this course, we explore WWII, focusing on China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Burma, India, the Philippines, and Indonesia, with side trips to Singapore and Hong Kong. We explore the tensions following the creation of European colonies in the late 19th centuries, the anti-colonial and state modernization projects that swept the region up to WWII, the rise of the Japanese militarism and empire, the outbreak of the war (1937 in Asia), logistics and strategy, war crimes on all sides of the conflict, the war at sea and on land, its effects on society, and the aftermath, both the unresolved political tensions, and the war’s memory and memorialization across the region.

Instructor

Blaine Chiasson is a professor of Modern Chinese history whose particular topics are Russian-Chinese history, Chinese minority policy, Chinese urban history, Asian military history, and the history of the 1900 Boxer rebellion. He is the author of several articles, one book, and is working on a new project on the 1900-1902 occupation of Beijing.

The Origins of Liberalism: Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Mill

  • Dates: Fridays, from April 7 to May 19 (No class Friday, April 14)
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 1:30 p.m. to 3:20 p.m.

What is liberalism? And where did it come from? This course discusses the political and moral ideas of Hobbes (especially), and the related ideas of Locke, Hume, and Mill, all of which were extremely influential in the western and especially Anglo-American tradition of thought on these matters. Hobbes is not ordinarily thought of as a “liberal”, but in this discussion it will be shown that he is, despite his political proposals. Later philosophers (rightly) rejected his politics, but they by and large built on his moral views, which are fundamental to our time. Interesting questions about what happened to the later ideas called “liberal” in current times will be raised, for they differ sharply from the small-government leanings of at least three of these four.

Instructor

Jan Narveson is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the University of Waterloo in Canada. He is the author of seven published books, notably The Libertarian Idea (1988 and 2001), You and The State (2008), and This is Ethical Theory (2010), and of several hundred articles and reviews in philosophical journals and collections. He has also been active in the presentation of classical music concerts (about 2,000 so far) as president of the Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music Society. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1989 and in 2003, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, which is that country's highest recognition of civilian achievement.

The Science of Everyday Life

  • Dates: Fridays, from April 7 to May 19 (No class Friday, April 14)
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 3:30 p.m. to 5:20 p.m.

Every day we experience science. We see it in the media, consider it while analyzing our health and diet, think about it when it is a political issue, use it in medicine, healthcare, phones, TVs, and even potato chip bags! Whether you think of it as science or not, it is there helping us to understand our world and make it better. This course is designed to touch on the science behind a number of topics that elicit discussion and debate in our society including: global warming, pollution, vaccines, cancer, stem cells, naturopathic and pharmaceutical medicine, fad diets, artificial intelligence, and nanotechnology.

Instructor

Cheryl Schaefer received a Bachelor of Education from Brock University, an Honours Biology degree from Laurier and a Master of Zoology from the University of Western Ontario. Her specialities are science and geography which are uniquely fitted to the course The Science of Everyday Life. As a part-time instructor she spends her time teaching at many schools: she is a supply teacher for the Waterloo Region District School Board high schools, a part-time professor at Conestoga College, and a part-time instructor here at Laurier.

Computers and the Future

  • Dates: Mondays, from April 3 to May 9.
  • Location: Waterloo campus
  • Time: 11:30 a.m. to 1:20 p.m.

Computer technology is having a greater and greater impact on all aspects of our day-to-day activities. We are entering the fourth "industrial age". The first three were caused by the development of the steam engine, electricity and electronics respectively, The fourth is being driven by Artificial Intelligence.The course will summarize the current state of computer technology (hardware, software & data) and then describe some of the important applications in manufacturing, medicine, finance, retailing, education and politics. It will look at projected changes in social networking. Special attention will be given to the impact of automation, loss of privacy and "computers that think". The course will conclude with predictions on how governments should/will react to the profound changes that are coming in society.

Instructor

John B. Moore is Professor Emeritus at the University of Waterloo. He has been a high school teacher, systems engineer with IBM, professor of Management Science at UW, author of five books on computing, business owner, computer consultant and past president of the Rotary Club of Kitchener.

Port Dover Course Offerings for Spring 2017

Port Dover: A History

  • Dates: Tuesdays, from April 4 to April 25
  • Location: St. Paul’s Anglican Church, 302 St. George Street, Port Dover
  • Time: 10 a.m. to noon

A history of Port Dover and area from before the War of 1812 until today with emphasis on what we know about the pre-contact era; wars and rebellions of the 19th century; the shipping and railway history of the 19th and 20th centuries; tourism and social history of the 20th century; and a journey down memory lane to the Summer Garden, a legendary musical hotspot.

Instructor

Ian Bell is a Canadian folk musician, composer, and singer-songwriter who has been active in the Canadian folk music scene since the 1970s. He has been the leader of The Dawnbreakers and Professor Chalaupka's Celebrated Singing School. Bell has performed at the Edmonton Folk Music Festival and the Mariposa Folk Festival, among others. He has contributed to the development and preservation of Canadian folk music for more than twenty-five years. He sings both old songs and his own original compositions and draws inspiration from his work when he was the curator of the Port Dover Harbour Museum.


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