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Becoming a Golden Hawk means more than just cheering on our (really good) varsity teams – it means being a student who cares about your community, who works hard in the classroom, and who takes advantage of all the learning opportunities that can happen outside the classroom, too.


The Centre for Public Safety and Well-Being (CPSW) offers public lectures and other special events to the general public and everyone is welcome to attend. The CPSW brings academic and professional experts from Canada and around the world to share their research, experiences and ideas on a wide variety of interesting and topical subjects related to Public Safety and Well-Being.

Upcoming Public Lectures

Lectures are open to the public and free tickets are available on a first-come-first-served basis. Please register for any of the lectures below.

For more information about our events, contact us at cpsw@wlu.ca at 519.756.8228 x5576.

Big Data Analytics for Cyber Security: Opportunities and Risks

Important update: Due to flight delays caused by inclement weather, our public lecture tonight has been adjusted. Dr. Janet Chan is no longer able to join us; Dr. Lyria Bennet Moses will speak as planned at 7 p.m. with an adjusted topic.

Lecture Details

  • Date: Oct. 30, 3017 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
  • Location: Research and Academic Centre, RCE004, 150 Dalhousie Street, Brantford.
Can “Big Data” Analytics Predict Policing Practice?

Predictive policing—the use of data, combined with mathematical or machine learning algorithms to predict the risks of crime in specific locations and times—has raised hopes as well as strengthened the rhetoric of using technology for crime control. The apparently enthusiastic uptake of predictive policing software in the US and elsewhere, together with the hype of “Big Data”, has created a new orthodoxy that technology can make policing “smarter” and “information-based” rather than subject to human bias and occupational habits. Yet, predictive policing software necessarily relies on an incomplete picture of crime, with data systematically skewed by both historic practices and the operation of predictive policing programs themselves. By reviewing past and current research on the use of technology and innovation by police, this paper develops a framework for conceptualizing factors that affect the uptake of predictive policing and processes that influence its impact on police practice.

Registration

The lecture is free and open to the public. Register for the lecture.

Speakers

Professor Lyria Bennett Moses, UNSW Sydney

Lyria Bennett MosesLyria is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at UNSW Sydney. Lyria's research explores issues around the relationship between technology and law, including the types of legal issues that arise as technology changes, how these issues are addressed in Australia and other jurisdictions, the application of standard legal categories such as property in new socio-technical contexts, the use of technologically-specific and sui generis legal rules, and the problems of treating “technology” as an object of regulation. Lyria is currently a Key Researcher and Project Leader on the Data to Decisions CRC, exploring legal and policy issues surrounding the use of data and data analytics for law enforcement and national security. Lyria is also Chair of the Australia Chapter of the IEEE Society for the Social Implications of Technology, Academic Co-Director of the Cyberspace Law and Policy Community, Chair of the Law, Technology and Innovation Research Network at UNSW Law and a PLuS Alliance Fellow.

Policing White-Collar Crime and Organized Crime in International Markets in Trafficked Cultural Objects

This talk will consider the challenges of policing the illicit market in cultural objects as a form of transnational crime at each of three points: in source countries, in transit, and in the destination markets. We will begin by reviewing some major examples of antiquities trafficking selected from the encyclopedia of trafficking on our website at www.traffickingculture.org. Next we will look more closely at evidence of the paths that looted cultural objects take out of source countries, and the various roles of the players involved in their removal and transit. This evidence is in the form of first-hand accounts of participation in looting and trafficking, gathered in the course of investigations conducted by the team at Trafficking Culture. The reception of looted and trafficked cultural goods by the market will also be considered: how do actors in the public trade protect themselves both against the possibility of dealing in stolen ancient artworks, and also against potential police intervention and subsequent prosecution if they do? The answer to this reveals much about the relationship between contemporary high-end antiquities trading, policing and the law.

Lecture Details

  • Date: Nov. 6, 2017 from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
  • Location: Research and Academic Centre, RCE004, 150 Dalhousie Street, Brantford.

Registration

The lecture is free and open to the public. Register for the lecture.

Speaker

Simon Mackenzie, Professor of Criminology, Victoria University of Wellington

Simon MackenzieSimon Mackenzie is Professor of Criminology at Victoria University of Wellington and Professor of Criminology, Law and Society in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research at the University of Glasgow. He is a member of the Trafficking Culture international research consortium which runs an educational and awareness-raising website at traffickingculture.org and was set up with grant funding from the European Research Council. Simon teaches undergraduate courses on organized crime and white-collar crime at Victoria, and a postgraduate course on transnational crime.

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