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Wilfrid Laurier University Leaf
April 17, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Criminology



Criminology at Laurier Brantford 

Society is fascinated with crime. It predominates in our entertainment, on television, in movies, and in books. It can change — for better or for worse — how we live, think and grow, both individually and as a society. 

Criminology is an academic discipline that provides students with exposure to a variety of theories, research studies and social issues in a broad range of subjects. Courses focus on areas such as 

  • young offenders
  • corporate crime
  • the history of criminality
  • multiple murder
  • forensic science 
  • the role of the media in creating images of crime. 

Your studies in our unique program will also expose you to the field of Contemporary Studies, broadening your grasp of ideas and issues from various academic disciplines. 

Program highlights 

  • Community involvement enhances education. Judges lecture series is one example of how community and students interact to enhance the university experience.
  • Fourth year practicum placements allow students to gain hands-on experience with an agency of their choice.
  • Third and fourth year criminology students are often hired to act as assistants on faculty research projects. 
  • Students interested in criminology can join the Criminology Students’ Association. Faculty teaching in the Criminology program act as advisors to the club and assist in organizing events. These might include the annual Careers in Criminology fair, field trips to penitentiaries, courts and police stations, guest lectures, movie nights, debates and political lobbying activities. 

Courses offered

Popular courses

  • Murder in Canada
  • Gangsters, Goodfellas & Wiseguys: North American Perspectives of Organized Crime
  • Terrorism Criminology & Contemporary Issues
  • Law, Morality & Punishment
  • Organized Crime: International Perspectives
  • Victimology

Admission requirements 

High School Admission Requirements College Grad Admission Requirements 

4U English at 60%

Average in top 6 4U or M courses of low - mid 70's

4U English or college equivalent @ 60%

Overall average upon graduation in mid 70%

Click here for transfer credit details 

Careers

Graduates of the Honours BA in Criminology at Brantford will find careers in community services, probation, parole, policing, corrections, customs and the gaming industry as well as continued studies in criminology, sociology, anthropology, and at law school and faculties of education.

Student experience 

0000Lindsay.jpgFor Eathan Lindsay, Laurier Brantford offered him the chance to start his criminology courses right away, and the opportunity to stay close to home. The Hamilton, Ontario native liked that he could jump right into criminology in first year, something that other programs didn’t offer. But it is the campus that made his first year so enjoyable.

“The campus is smaller than many others, so the professors are much more approachable,” he says. And after living in residence, he met lots of classmates and students in other programs, which helped make Lindsay’s first year a good experience. He enjoyed the year end residence formal, which was a great time. “It was so much fun! There was great food, great dancing and fun prizes,” he says. 

Faculty experience

0000Flemming.jpgDr. Thomas Fleming has many interests, from researching the life and mysterious death of artist Tom Thomson, to weightlifting and examining the state’s response to homelessness. He is best known, however, as an expert on serial killers. Although your chances of falling victim to a serial killer “are similar to winning Lotto 649 three weeks running,” the public has a fascination with serial killers, violence and crime in general, says Fleming, who has a PhD in sociology with special reference to criminology. 

Do the mass media paint an accurate picture of serial killers? Not really. Dr. Hannibal Lecter from The Silence of the Lambs notwithstanding, “super intellectual serial killers don’t exist,” says Fleming, and Hollywood’s take on real serial killers such as Aileen Wuornos in the film Monster, are not very accurate. Fleming has provided background academic information on serial killers to the Campbell inquiry in the investigation into the serial rapes and murders committed by Paul Bernardo. He is the author of nine books that have been used in universities and colleges across Canada, and is also a founding member of the Canadian Society of Criminology.