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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Science
July 31, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Cognitive Neuroscience Grad Students



 

Cognitive Neuroscience graduate students at Laurier work with one advisor during their Master's program. During the Doctoral program students work with at least two faculty members beyond their primary advisor, increasing the breadth of research training. Students are engaged in a multitude of interesting projects as you'll read below.


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Fahad Naveed Ahmad Ph.D. candidate
ahma2720 [at] mylaurier.ca

My name is Fahad Naveed Ahmad. I completed a major in Psychology and French at U of T. I am a first year Ph.D. candidate in the Cognitive Neuroscience program at Wilfrid Laurier University. My Ph.D. advisor is Dr. William Hockley. My research interests lie within the realm of recognition memory. More specifically, I am interested in how item and associative information can be better encoded, learned and retrieved by measuring recognition memory of individuals. In terms of my Ph.D., I will be examining specifically how certain information is better encoded than other information due to better binding during study. My secondary research interest is examining how recognition memory interacts with other cognitive processes such as perception and attention. I will also collaborate with researchers examining the ERP correlates of recognition memory, the effects of aging and social factors on recognition memory.

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Zeynep Barlas Ph.D candidate barl0270 [at] mylaurier.ca

I am a first year Ph.D. student in the Cognitive Neuroscience program at Laurier working in the Social Brain, Body and Action Lab of Dr. Obhi. I did my undergraduate degree in Computer Science and Engineering and my masterís degree in Cognitive Science. My primary research interest lies within the realm of action awareness and subjective experience of agency. More specifically, I am investigating the underlying mechanisms and the neural correlates of the sense of agency, i.e. the sense that one is the author of their actions and the consequences, both on individual basis and in social contexts. I am also interested in understanding the extent to which bottom-up and top-down processes are involved to give rise to the (un)conscious perception of the world around us.

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Brittany Barnes, M.Sc Candidate barn5670 [at] mylaurier.ca

I am a 1st year Masterís student in the Cognitive Neuroscience program at Wilfrid Laurier University. I obtained my undergraduate degree at Brock University in Neuroscience. My research interests are concentrated on the action execution-observation system with a particular focus on the role of motor simulation in social cognitive processes. I am currently using TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) to investigate whether motor simulation is involved in the ability to form and maintain memories of actions. I am also interested in how motor simulation contributes to the understanding of perceived actions. I collaborate with Dr. Sukhvinder Obhi in the Social Brain, Body and Action Lab.

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Jeremy Hogeveen Ph.D. candidate

I am in the final year of a doctoral program in Cognitive Neuroscience at Wilfrid Laurier University, where I also completed my MSc. My research is at the intersection of cognitive neuroscience and social psychology, with a specific interest in the brain basis of the tendency for humans to unintentionally and spontaneously mimic each other during social interactions. Thus far, our work has employed TMS, EEG, and behavioural methods to study imitation in controlled laboratory based tasks, as well as mimicry during (relatively) natural social intreraction. I collaborate with Dr. Sukhvinder S. Obhi.

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Frederico Pieruccini-Faria Ph.D. candidate
pier6780 [at] mylaurier.ca

I am a third year Ph.D. student in the Cognitive Neuroscience program at Laurier working in the lab of Dr. Quincy Almeida (Sun Life Movement Disorders Research Centre) and Dr. Jeffrey Jones (Psychology). I did my undergraduate degree at University of Sao Paulo State at Rio Claro-Brazil. Broadly, my research interests lie within the realm of Parkinsonís disease. More specifically I am investigating how ďfreezing of gaitĒ, an incapacitating phenomenon that affects 30% of all patients, could affect their capacity of gait adaptation. I am also investigating the role of basal ganglia and specific cognitive impairments caused by Parkinsonís disease on patientsí motor control.

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Nichole Scheerer  Ph.D. candidate
sche7200 [at] mylaurier.ca

I am a second year Ph.D. student in the Cognitive Neuroscience program at Laurier. Working in the lab of Dr. Jeffrey Jones, I study speech development. More specifically, I work with electroencephalography in order to examine the effects of altered auditory feedback on the neural processing involved in speech production in children