Site Accessibility Statement
Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
April 23, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

200-/300-level Courses, 2013-14



Detailed Course Information, 2013-14

Note 1: First-year students may not choose 200- or 300-level English courses.

Note 2: For large lectures with tutorials, students must register for a lecture and one tutorial. All tutorials begin in Week 2.

Note 3: The Department cannot add students into full courses even if they are needed to fulfill graduation requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to put themselves on course waitlists as early in the Spring registration period as possible.

Note 4: Students who arrive at the beginning of term without having made any course selections will be advised to add themselves into open courses and onto the waitlist of closed courses, even if that means they don't acquire all of the English courses they'd planned to take.

Warnings

The university reserves the right to remove you at any time from any courses that you have registered for contrary to the regulations. For example, if you register in more courses than allowed, in courses for which you have exclusions, in courses for which you lack prerequisites or in courses which are inappropriate due to any other university regulation, the university reserves the right to remove you even after classes have begun. Nevertheless, it is your responsibility to make the appropriate selections. The university does not guarantee that your errors will be caught.

Course

Number

Title

Term

Day / Time

Instructor

201

Children’s Literature

W

R 12:30-2:20

Dr. K. Bell

A historical and/or critical study of children's literature in English. Possible emphases include formal literary analysis, the social and cultural significance of works written for (or adopted by) children, and relationships between image and text in illustrated books.

NOTE: Students will participate in online tutorials for this course.






































207

Comic Drama

W

TR 11:30-12:50

Dr. A. Russell

This course is an introduction to English comic drama. We will consider theories of comedy as well as comic practices and conventions. The plays we will read include satire, romantic comedy, "problem comedy," and comedy of manners. Class time will be taken up with lectures, class discussions, and some group work. In addition, we will analyze selected scenes from filmed versions of some of the plays under consideration

209n

Special Topics:

The Creative Process

F

TR 1:00-2:20

Dr. T. MacDonald

This course focuses on the creative processes involved in the making of literature, especially fiction and poetry. Using authors' drafts, diaries, letters, and interviews, we will discuss the dynamics of the creative process through examples from historical and contemporary literature, including the effect of collaboration and the impact of events, people, and ideas that influenced the development of the texts. We will concentrate especially on changes the authors made during their revision process, coming to an understanding of the significance of rewriting as a crucial stage in the creative process. Texts will include work by William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, W.B. Yeats, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Erin Mouré, Dennis Lee, bp Nichol, Raymond Carver, Maria Campbell and Linda Griffiths, among others.

NOTE: This course counts in Category 4 of the Honours and Combined Honours English Programs.

210

Literature and Social Change

F

R 1:00-3:50

Dr. J. Esmail

This course will attend to how writers and readers, from different nations and periods, have envisioned the role of literature in creating social change. While the course will address texts that deal with a range of social issues through time ? from slavery to feminism to animal rights -- emphasis will be placed on how these different writers have shared the belief that the literary -- whether fiction, poetry or life writing -- is an important forum for social critique. This course, then, will involve a consideration of broader questions about the social value of writing, reading, and studying literature.

Please note: Admission to this course will be by application only: it is part of the Inside Out program and will take place at the Grand Valley Institution for Women in Kitchener. To apply for this course, send a 250 word statement of interest to Dr. Jennifer Esmail (jesmail@wlu.ca). For first consideration, applications from English majors must be received by April 30. If spaces are still available, applications will be accepted from all Faculty of Arts majors by May 30.

211

Postcolonial Literatures

W

TR 4:00-5:20

Dr. M. Hron

This course offers a cross-cultural survey of works from English postcolonial contexts (e.g., Africa, Southeast Asia, Oceania, Caribbean and North America) and explores these countries' shared postcolonial experience (examining such topics as imperialism, orientalism, neo-colonialism, education, language, family relationships, cultural traditions and popular resistance). In addition to revelling in the storytelling, imagination and humour in these texts, we will pay special attention to topics that shape our multicultural world (such as class, gender, ethnicity or nationality) and broach such complex global issues as immigration, economic development, social injustice, poverty, violence or war. Summer Reading Suggestions: Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Murayama’s All I Asking for is My Body, Hosseini’s Kite Runner.

213

The African Child

F

TR 11:30 - 12:50

Dr. M. Hron

This course, especially suited for those considering Teacher’s College, explores the figure of the African child. We will survey Western representations of the African child, from 18th century discourses to present-day charity appeals (e.g., Kony 2012 video). More importantly, delving into African texts, we will investigate such varied issues as children in African myths, neo/colonial education, gender and ethnicity, child soldiers, child slaves, AIDS orphans, immigrant children, sentimentalism and humor etc.   Summer Reading Suggestions: Okorafor’s Akata Witch, Iweala’s Beasts of No Nations, Evaristo’s Blonde Roots. Students considering Teacher’s College should read Stratton’s Chanda’s Secrets or Ellis’ Heaven Shop.

Exclusion: EN 209j

218

Contemporary American Literature

W

TR 11:30-12:50


Selected fiction, poetry and drama by United States authors whose major works have appeared in the period from about 1945 to the present.

220

Reading Culture: Strategies and Approaches

F

MWF 10:30-11:20


An extension of the practices involved in reading written texts, literary and non-literary, to the interpretation of other cultural forms, (for example, film, graphics, TV programming). There will be some attention to theories that offer a general model for how meaning is constructed and exchanged.

225

The Woman Writer: Theory and Practice

F

TR 4:00-5:20


Women writers and women's writing, with illustration of the literature of different historical periods and a variety of literary genres. Some special attention will be given to feminist literary criticism and theory and to such questions as whether there is a uniquely "female'' literary imagination.

226

Women in Fiction

W

MWF 9:30-10:20


The images of women in a selection of fiction by women (and some men) writers in the past 200 years.

231

Arthurian Traditions

W

TR 10:00-11:20


Students will examine the medieval origins and modern adaptations of Arthurian legends as well as the key figures of these stories, such as King Arthur, Sir Lancelot, Guinevere, Sir Gawain and Morgan La Fee. Though this course concentrates mainly on texts, it may also include examinations of Arthurian material within films and multi-media environments such as internet websites and video games. (No prior knowledge of medieval literature or computer technologies is necessary).

233A

Shakespeare:

Comedies & Romances

F

TR 11:30-12:50

Dr. V. Comensoli

A study of selected comedies and dramatic romances by William Shakespeare. The focus is on the interconnections between the plays’ generic structures, Early Modern theatrical traditions and practices, and cultural representations of gender as a category of identity and performance. Classes involve a combination of lectures, group work, and class discussion including the analysis of selected scenes from video or film adaptations of the plays.

233B

Shakespeare:

Comedies & Romances

W

TR 11:30-12:50

Dr. V. Comensoli

A study of selected comedies and dramatic romances by William Shakespeare. The focus is on the interconnections between the plays’ generic structures, Early Modern theatrical traditions and practices, and cultural representations of gender as a category of identity and performance. Classes involve a combination of lectures, group work, and class discussion including the analysis of selected scenes from video or film adaptations of the plays.

234

Shakespeare:

Histories & Tragedies

F

TR 2:30-3:50

Dr. A. Russell

This course explores a selection of Shakespeare’s histories and tragedies, with a focus on their theatrical and cultural contexts. These plays represent early modern perspectives on gender, race, and class in ways that may at times seem alien to us, yet also familiar and recognizable. As we analyze Shakespeare’s narrative and theatrical strategies, we will consider how the generic terms "tragedy" and "history" have been used to frame responses to the plays. We will supplement our focus on the play texts by considering selected filmed performances.

246

The English Literary Tradition II

F

MWF 12:30-1:20


This course provides students an historical and critical survey of influential literary works from 1660 to the 20th century

249A

Mystery and Crime Fiction

F

TR 4:00-5:20


A study of the development of the crime gene in fiction from nineteenth-century "tales of ratiocination" to contemporary police narratives in relation to socio-historical and national contexts.

249B

Mystery and Crime Fiction

W

M 7:00-9:50


A study of the development of the crime gene in fiction from nineteenth-century "tales of ratiocination" to contemporary police narratives in relation to socio-historical and national contexts.

263

Canadian Fiction Before 1980

W

TR 1:00-2:20


A survey of Canadian literature from the colonial period to the late modernist period (c. 1840-1979). The course explores the beginnings of a national literature in Canada through representative literary works that foreground the social and historical impact of frontierism, settlement, Confederation, modernism and the rise of Trudeau-era nationalism. Works may include novels, short stories, life writing and literary criticism.

265

American Literature to 1900

F

MW 2:30-3:50

Dr. L. Shakinovsky

A study of nineteenth-century American literature including fiction, poetry, and a few non-fictional prose texts. Consideration is given to the historical and social context in which texts drawn from a range of political and generic possibilities were produced. Authors studied include Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Dickinson, Douglass, and Jacobs.

266

American Lit. of the Early 20th Century

W

MWF 10:30-11:20

Dr. L. Shakinovsky

A survey of selected works (fiction, poetry, and essays) by American authors of the first half of the twentieth century. The course explores disparate literary movements of the period, such as realism, modernism, and the Harlem Renaissance, through the writings of figures such as T.S. Eliot, Edith Wharton, William Faulkner, and Langston Hughes.

267

Contemporary Canadian Fiction

F

TR 1:00-2:20


A survey of Canadian fiction written in English from 1980 to the present. The course explores the concept of a national literature in Canada since the publishing boom of the 1980s, with an emphasis on the social shifts presented by feminist, postcolonial and transnational literary works. Texts will include novels and short stories by authors such as Michael Ondaatje, Thomas King, Margaret Atwood and Alice Munro, among others.

280

Indigenous Writers in English

F

TR 8:30-9:50


Selected texts will be explored using cultural and literary critical forms, which enable the reader to approach the works "from a tribal-centered criticism ... which moves from the culturally centered text outward" (Blaesar in Vizenor, Writing in the Oral Tradition). In reading the texts 'from the inside out,' the texts themselves reveal the critical perspectives appropriate to their study. The texts are written in English to enable indigenous writers to speak out to other cultures and educate them about their experiences.

281

Cyborg Fictions

F

TR 11:30-12:50

Dr. A. Austin

This course will introduce students to the vibrant and still emerging cyberpunk movement in literature and film. The cyborg tends to unsettle all categories of difference, moving beyond the "meat/machine meld" to threaten additional hierarchies, including those of race, class, and gender. Students will explore central literary and cinematic texts of the cyberpunk movement, including foundational works by William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Philip K. Dick, and Ridley Scott. Students will also have the opportunity to consider the current direction of cyberpunk fiction in more recent texts, including the phenomenally successful Matrix series and the movement of the cyborg into mainstream children’s fare, as in Disney’s Treasure Planet. Additionally, students will investigate a number of theoretical concepts central to cyberculture, including Baudrillard on the simulacrum, Benjamin and the panopticon, and Benedikt on the architecture of lightness.

Exclusion: EN 209d

285

Tween Literature and Culture

F

M 7:00-9:50

Dr. K. Bell

An exploration of literature produced for children in intermediate school, grades 6-8, with emphasis on texts since the 1960s. Students will examine the history, major authors, thematic concerns, genres and cultural milieu of tween literature. In addition to books, other texts that tweens consume, including music, magazines, television, and films may be examined.

NOTE: This course no longer has tutorials






































286

Young Adult Literature and Culture

F

MW 4:00-5:20

Dr. K. Bell

An exploration of literature produced for adolescents, with emphasis on texts since the 1960s. Students will attend to a range of cultural and literary topics, including genre, history, representations of adolescence and adulthood, central themes, social issues, and approaches to reading and interpretation. Other topics may include mass culture, film adaptation, seriality, and censorship.

292

Early Romantic Literature

F

TR 2:30-3:50

Dr. M. Poetzsch

The Romantic Age is generally understood as spanning the years 1780-1840, and this course will consider the diverse poetry and prose produced in the first half of this period by writers such as Charlotte Smith, William Blake, William Godwin, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Bage, John Thelwall and others. Set against the backdrop of the American and French Revolutions and the Napoleonic Wars, the writings of the early Romantics explore such issues as natural rights and gender roles, humanitarianism and idealism, the individual and exotic otherness, industrial reform and the return to nature. Central to each of these debates is a concern with the writer's dual role as a mediator of socio-cultural events and a social being, one who acts (or strives to act) in the world through words. Wordsworth's conception of the poet as the "rock of defense for human nature" will be scrutinized throughout the course both for what it suggests about the Romantic faith in poetic imagination and what it implies about the writer's ineluctable distance from the human and the natural.

293

Later Romantic Literature

W

TR 2:30-3:50

Dr. M. Poetzsch

The Romantic Age is generally understood as spanning the years 1780-1840, and this course will consider the diverse poetry and prose produced in the second half of this period by writers such as Lord Byron, Jane Austen, Percy and Mary Shelley, John Keats, Thomas De Quincey, Felicia Hemans, Letitia Landon and John Clare. Often in dialogue and occasionally in dispute with earlier writers like Wordsworth, Coleridge, Godwin and Wollstonecraft, the work of second-generation Romantics is characterized by a deep engagement with the supernatural and transcendent, with nature as a source of terror and upheaval as well as consolation, with the role of writing as a tool of social reform, and, perhaps above all, with the life of the mind—the layers and labyrinths of consciousness, the weight of memory and the psychology of isolation.

298

British Literature 1900-1920

F

MWF 11:30-12:20

Dr. M. DiCenzo

A study of poetry, fiction, drama and essays from the turn-of-the-century to just after the First World War. Works by authors such as Hardy, Mew, Yeats, Conrad, Forster, Galsworthy, Shaw, Lawrence, Mansfield and Wilfred Owen are read in the context of the social, technological, cultural and political changes of the Edwardian era and the devastating impact of the war in the years which followed.

299

British Literature, 1920-1939

W

MW 2:30-3:50

Dr. M. DiCenzo

A study of poetry, fiction, drama, and essays published in the twenties and thirties, including significant departures in literary form in works by authors such as Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, Sitwell, Yeats, Huxley, Orwell, and Auden. The course will focus on modernism as well as other major tendencies in the social, intellectual and political life of these decades. Some attention will be given to the development of modern criticism and to the relation between literature and the other arts.

301

Literary Theory

F

TR 10:00-11:20

Dr. M. Poetzsch

A comparative survey of the principles underlying today’s most prominent critical approaches to literary and cultural studies. We explore such contested territories as historicisms, formalism, structuralism, psycho-analytical interpretation, deconstruction, feminism and gender studies, post-coloniality, and popular literary culture.

Exclusion: EN291

Note: This course is required for Honours English majors and counts in Category 4 of the Honours program.

309g

Special Topics: Middle Eastern North American Narratives

W

MW 4:00-5:20


This course will examine cultural and literary productions of Arab-Canadian and Arab-American writers and artists, in relation to their historical, cultural, and socio-political contexts. Paying particular attention to the genre of fiction, from the late 1970’s to today, this course will examine the ways in which this sample of writers and artists deploy diverse and innovative narrative strategies in order to re-imagine and represent their diasporic and migrant experiences and identities. Of particular interest are the ways in which "diaspora" is conceptualized as a mode of cultural and literary analysis, practice, and critique by these writers. Topics and themes such as exile, home, violence, memory, hybridity, cultural translation, language and identity, intergenerational relationships, the effects of September 9/11, and the intersections between gender, sexuality, and nationhood are investigated in the novels we will study. Texts may include Marwan Hassan’s The Confusion of Stones, Layla Halaby’s Once in a Promised Land, Diana Abu Jaber’s Crescent, and Etel Adnan’s Sitt Marie Rose.

Note: This course counts in Category 3 of the Honours and Combined Honours programs.

309m

Special Topics:

Post-9/11 American Fiction

F

T 7:00-9:50


In contemporary American society, images such as Richard Drew’s The Falling Man have been censored in media and government discourse, and substituted with traditional images of heroic masculinity. This censorship reveals a cultural reluctance to focus on "emasculating" images of helpless and fated American masculinity. This course will explore how key American novelists rescue the Falling Man image and feature it as a prominent trope, exploring the destabilizing effects of the War on Terror on American masculine identity and gender politics. More specifically, we will focus on a particular type of hegemonic masculinity: the transnational American business professional, who practices a sublimated mode of aggression through capitalistic expansion. These novelists depict the negative effects of this ethos on interpersonal relationships, which results in affairs, separation, and divorce – domestic crises which are paralleled to the nation’s geopolitical crises in the Middle East. Ultimately, this course will trace these masculine practices back to an American mode of individualism based on neoliberal freedom within the context of free market capitalism. Novels such as DeLillo’s Falling Man, Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist, Halaby’s Once in a Promised Land, and Kalfus’ A Disorder Peculiar to the Country will be analyzed in conjunction with scholarship on masculinities, gender, diaspora, transnational capitalism, trauma, and existential psychology.

Note: This course counts in Category 3 of the Honours and Combined Honours programs.

309p

Special Topics:

Writing Short Fiction

W

TR 10:00-11:20

Dr. T. Dobozy

EN 309p brings together the scholarly study and practical application necessary to write short fiction. Students will be expected to read, analyze and discuss individual examples of short fiction, both in English and translation, as well as writings by selected authors on aspects of artistic practice and craft, to consider how culture, politics, theory, and technique ultimately come together in given works. A student's mark will be determined through written and oral assignments culminating in the production of a final assignment in the form of a critical exegesis accompanying a sustained and coherent work of short fiction developed from exercises throughout the term. There will be discrete "workshopping" sessions during class time in which students will have opportunity to share and comment on each other's creative work. As well, EN 309p will offer strategies on being published in journals, and how to properly approach an agent and a literary press. Students will complete the course with a sense of the basic craft necessary to begin writing fiction, and an understanding of the major intellectual and aesthetic currents that have occupied writers of short fiction from the early 19th century to the present.

Please note: This course is restricted to senior students only and admission to this course will be by application only.  Students must submit a portfolio of 10-15 pages, double-spaced, of original fiction (i.e., written by the applicant) to the English Department office, 3-120 Woods Building. These portfolios will form the basis of admission to the course.  Upon receipt and approval applicants will be able to register.  For any further information or queries, please contact the course instructor, Prof. Tamas Dobozy (tdobozy@wlu.ca).

For first consideration, applications from English majors must be received by October 30.  If spaces are still available, applications will be accepted from all Faculty of Arts majors by November 30.

Note: This course counts in Category 4 of the Honours and Combined Honours programs.

310

The Politics of Transgression and Desire

F

MWF 11:30-12:20


An examination of literary representations of physical, economic, social and political instabilities and upheavals. The course will consider ways in which transgressive acts against authority of the law serve to interrogate the boundaries between self and other, between a culture's desires and fears.

324

Canadian Women’s Writing

W

TR 8:30-9:50


Recent prose, poetry, drama and fiction-theory contributions to literature in Canada by women from various communities and perspectives. Questions of gender and sexuality, ethnicity, race and class considered alongside contemporary developments in literary theory and practice.

325

Feminist Theory and Cultural Practice: Fiction by Minority Women

W

TR 10:00-11:20


A study of fiction by 20th-century women writers of racial minorities in America and Canada in light of current feminist theory.

326

Contemporary Drama

W

MW 2:30-3:50


An examination of developments in realism, expressionism and absurdist theatre in the 20th century.

330

Human Rights in Contemporary Cultural Forms

F

TR 10:00-11:20

Dr. M. Hron

This course offers a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary examination of current human rights discourse through a variety of cultural forms (eg. literature, film, photos, Webmedia, music, legal documents, etc). We may explore such human rights issues as civil & political rights (imprisonment, torture, censorship), economic social & cultural rights (women's, children's, refugee rights, modern slavery, environmental rights), genocide and conflict resolution. Humanitarianism and activism will be of particular concern. Summer Reading Suggestions: Ben Jelloun's Blinding Absence of Light, Abani’s Song for Night, Hatzfeld's Strategy of the Antelopes.

344

18th-Century Fiction

F

MWF 10:30-11:20


A study of the rise of the novel from its beginning as "true history," factual fiction, travel narrative and romance to the development of genres such as memoirs, the comic, picaresque, the sentimental and gothic novel. This course explores the connection between social and cultural history and literature, between Enlightenment thinking, domesticity and sensibility, between subjectivity, power, desire and representation.

345

British Novel in the 19th Century

F

MW 4:00-5:20


A critical and cultural survey of the flourishing of the novel as a literary form during the Romantic and Victorian periods. Six representative works are usually selected for study, with emphasis on form, narrative technique and social context (including class and gender). Authors often chosen include Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans), Wilkie Collins, W.M. Thackeray, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thomas Hardy and Oscar Wilde.

346

The Novel After 1900

W

MW 2:30-3:50


Development of the novel since 1900 with emphasis on social context and on developments in theme and technique

350

Medieval Drama

W

MWF 12:30-1:20


A study of medieval drama and its impact on contemporary culture.

372

History of the English Language

W

TR 1:00-2:20

Dr. R. Waugh

This course relates the history of the English language from the medieval period to the present day, with an emphasis on the origins of the English language in the culture of the Anglo-Saxons. It will be structured around the elements of phonology, grammar, dialects, language families, the great shift from Old English to Middle English, and the present structure of the English language. We shall also take up many of the major cultural developments during the early Middle Ages, such as feud narratives, heroic myths, mystical expressions, and erotic riddles. This course is designed for Arts students of all disciplines, but students interested in teachers’ college should note that the structure and history of the language is at the centre of instruction in the language arts.

381

The Wired Story: Narrative Theory in the Electronic Age

W

TR 11:30-12:50

Dr. A. Austin

This course will trace the concept of narrative as it has evolved in various forms of digital media. While gaining a working knowledge of theories of narratology, students will first consider narrative structures common to cyberculture-themed texts in the more traditional media of short story and film. Students will then explore how digital story-based media challenge, complicate, extend, and develop these theories through readings of anime, hypertext fictions, and video games, including MMPORGs (Massive Multi-Player Online Role-playing Games). Students will also consider the proposition that digital media in general, but also particularly and specifically network computing, has fundamentally altered cultural concepts of what constitutes "narrative." Theorists to be studied include Gerard Genette, Roland Barthes, Jean Baudrillard, Peter Brooks, Wolfgang Iser, Paul Ricoeur, and Jesper Juul.

392

Writers of the Middle Ages

W

TR 1:00-2:20


An exploration of writers and genres representative of the Middle Ages. Genres might include romance, allegory, visionary works and dramas; writers might include William Langland, Sir Thomas Malory, Margery Kempe, or Julian of Norwich. Typically, this course will not include works by Chaucer.

393

Literature of the 16th Century

W

TR 2:30-3:50

Dr. V. Comensoli

A study of selected poetry, drama, and prose written in England during the sixteenth century. The main focus is on the relation between Renaissance Humanism and the preoccupation in the literature of the period with the human subject, gender and power relations, and the ideal society. Texts to be studied include Thomas More’s Utopia, Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus, drama and poetry by Shakespeare, selections from Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, and poetry by English and continental European women writers.

395

17th-Century Literature

F

TR 11:30-12:50

Dr. A. Russell

The course focuses on seventeenth-century literary texts, from a variety of genres, written shortly before, during, and after the English Civil Wars between King and Parliament. Issues debated during the period include the origins of political power; the place of religion in society; gender, class and race; colonization; and the interrelations of love, sex, and desire. Many of the texts we will read illuminate or reflect upon this period of great political and social instability. Texts include works by John Donne, Ben Jonson, George Herbert, Andrew Marvell, Katherine Philips, and Mary Wroth. We will conclude the course by reading John Milton’s epic, Paradise Lost (1666), which addresses all of the themes outlined above.

396

Mid-Victorian Literature: Culture and Anarchy

W

TR 10:00-11:20

Dr. J. Esmail

This course offers a survey of mid-Victorian literature that is designed to introduce you to the key writers, texts, themes and genres of the period. We will read these texts, by writers including Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë and Robert Browning, while attending to their historical and cultural contexts. The mid-Victorian period was a time of conflict and social change around issues including class, gender, imperialism, industrialism and technological innovation. We will therefore examine formal developments in literature while exploring the various social functions of this literature in Victorian culture.

398

Modernism to Postmodernism

F

MWF 1:30-2:20


This course studies the shift in aims, structures and techniques that revolutionized literary writing in the English-speaking world from roughly 1950 to 1980. Particular emphasis will be placed on tracing how and why the ideal of the beautifully-crafted literary work was rejected and replaced by new forms of freedom and exploration.

399

Postmodernism and the Role of the Reader

W

MWF 1:30-2:20


This course places emphasis on "contemporary writing," the writing of 1980 to today. Particular attention will be given to the increasing emphasis on the "role of the reader" as an active participant in the experience of reading.