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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
April 23, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

100-level Courses, 2013-14



Detailed Course Information, 2013-14

Note 1: First-year students may choose ONLY 100-level English courses.

Note 2: For large lectures with tutorials, students must register for a lecture and one tutorial. All tutorials begin in Week 2.

 

Course

Number

Title

Term

Day / Time

CRN

Instructor

119A

Reading Fiction

F

T 12:30-2:20

749

Dr. J. Esmail

In this course, we will read short stories and novels in order to explore the genre of fiction. An introduction to generic conventions, historical contexts and critical terminology will be combined with an examination of some larger questions about the genre: What is the value of reading fiction? How do various texts and genres conceive of the relationship between writer, narrator and reader? What is the connection between formal literary experimentation and a writer’s wider aesthetic and social aims? The fictional texts we will read in this course will range from the nineteenth-century novel to the contemporary graphic novel, by authors from various countries, but together they will allow us to investigate the contested parameters of the genre.

Tut 1

T 5:30-6:20

750

Tut 2

T 5:30-6:20

839

Tut 3

T 6:30-7:20

1005

Tut 4

T 6:30-7:20

1006

Tut 5

R 1:30-2:20

751

Tut 6

R 1:30-2:20

840

Tut 7

R 2:30-3:20

753

Tut 8

R 2:30-3:20

965

Tut 9

R 3:30-4:20

752

Tut 10

R 3:30-4:20

964

119B

Reading Fiction

W

W 2:30-4:20

654

Dr. M. Pirbhai

In this course, we will focus on the genre of fiction, keeping a number of questions in mind: Do stories follow rules? Can stories be rebellious? When fiction enters the realm of the fantastic or symbolic, does it lose touch with reality? What is the difference between opinion and interpretation? What is the difference between being critical and applying a critical approach? In other words, this course invites you to read and write about fiction by some of the world’s most celebrated authors through the art of literary analysis. (If you want to get a head-start, I recommend Salman Rushdie’s head-spinning novel Haroun and the Sea of Stories, or Emily Brönte’s broody, moody Wuthering Heights.)

Tut 1

W 5:30-6:20

709

Tut 2

W 5:30-6:20

711

Tut 3

W 6:30-7:20

676

Tut 4

W 6:30-7:20

712

Tut 5

R 5:30-6:20

710

Tut 6

R 5:30-6:20

713

Tut 7

R 6:30-7:20

826

Tut 8

R 6:30-7:20

827

Tut 9

R 7:30-8:20

828

Tut 10

R 7:30-8:20

829

120

Reading Poetry

W

T 2:30-4:20

3711

Dr. T. MacDonald

This course is designed to introduce students to the practice of reading and writing about poetry, in literary tradition and in contemporary reading practices. To do so, we will read poetry from a wide range of historical periods and cultural perspectives, and consider ways of reading formal, stylistic and rhetorical features as they appear in the poems. The course will introduce students to strategies for analysing and interpreting poetic texts, and exploring the ways that poetry challenges our perspectives on language. Poetry is the literary genre that uses the most compressed language, and we will work at unpacking that language in order to consider its beauties, its puzzles, its politics, and its enduring questions.

Tut 1

T 5:30-6:20

3712

Tut 2

T 5:30-6:20

3713

Tut 3

T 6:30-7:20

3714

Tut 4

T 6:30-7:20

3715

Tut 5

W 6:30-7:20

3716

Tut 6

W 5:30-6:20

3717

Tut 7

W 7:30-8:20

3718

Tut 8

W 6:30-7:20

3719

121

Reading Drama

F

M 2:30-4:20

4072

Dr. M. DiCenzo

The course is organized around the theme of the relationship between ‘theatre and society.’ It involves the study of major tendencies and achievements in drama and theatre, ranging from ancient Greek plays to the work of contemporary playwrights. The selected texts deal with a variety of themes and issues explored through the genre of drama (morality, power, gender, race, etc.). The plays will be considered as texts for performance and will be read in the context of theatre history (eg. performance spaces/theatre buildings, production styles, acting styles, and audiences).

Tut 1

T 1:30-2:20

4073

Tut 2

T 1:30-2:20

4074

Tut 3

T 2:30-3:20

4075

Tut 4

T 2:30-3:20

4076

Tut 5

T 3:30-4:20

4077

Tut 6

T 3:30-4:20

4078

Tut 7

T 4:30-5:20

4079

Tut 8

T 4:30-5:20

4080

 

165A

Enriched Literary Studies: Elements and Approaches

F

MW 2:30-3:50

3442

Dr. E. Ty

An intensive reading course that introduces students to the elements of literature and literary analysis through a variety of approaches and texts (fiction, poetry, drama, and prose) from different historical periods and cultural contexts. Students will read three novels (19th century to the present), a selection of poetry (ex., the sonnet, Metaphysical poetry, the dramatic monologue and lyric), and one 20th century play.

Novels to be studied: Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, and Richard Wagamese’s Indian Horse. Please read one or two novels over the summer.

 

165B

Enriched Literary Studies: Elements and Approaches

W

MW 2:30-3:50

3200

Dr. L. Shakinovsky

An intensive reading course that introduces students to the elements of literature and literary analysis through a variety of approaches and texts (fiction, poetry, drama, and prose) from different historical periods and cultural contexts. Students will read three novels (19th century to the present), a selection of poetry derived from various genres and periods, and one play.

First novel to be studied: Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre.