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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Education
December 20, 2014

Canadian Excellence

unemployment

Survey Results Are In!



As part of our routine program review process, we sent a survey to all of our alumni regarding their employment status and satisfaction with the program. Thanks to the many alums who completed the survey! In this newsletter, we will address the employment information; next time---the program satisfaction data.

According to the Faculty of Education Alumni Survey, more than 88% of alumni are reporting finding employment within 1 year of graduating, with the remainder finding a position between 1 and 2 years after graduating. This is far superior to the provincial averages as reported in the Transition to Teaching survey conducted annually by the Ontario College of Teachers.

According to our Faculty of Education Alumni Survey, approximately 32.1% of Laurier alumni currently have a full-time contract, 3.8 % have a part-time contract, 37.7% are in long-term occasional teaching positions (LTO; several weeks in the same classroom), and 26.4% are a daily occasional supply teacher (on call by the day for a different teacher, possibly in different schools).

Of those alumni employed, 61.6% are employed in publicly funded or private schools and a further 12.8 % are employed in an education-related field. Additionally, more than 60% of alumni are pursuing further education (i.e., additional qualifications, graduate degrees, or college-level diplomas or certificates).

As is typical in the current context, most alumni began their careers as LTOs or occasional supply teachers. In comparing the data for current type of position with the initial type of position, it is evident that many have been able to convert from LTOs and occasional supply teaching positions into full-time contracts. Initially, approximately 11.3% of Laurier alumni had a full-time contract, 3.8 % had a part-time contract (unchanged over time), 32.1% were in long-term occasional teaching positions (several weeks in the same classroom), and 52.8% were daily occasional supply teachers (on call by the day for a different teacher, possibly in different schools). This is encouraging information for future graduates!