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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
August 2, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Year 3 Course Offerings 2013-2014



HI306       War and Society in Africa
                Winter term
                Instructor: Dr. John Laband
                TR 2:30 - 3:50 pm

Africa has experienced, and continues to suffer, a particularly high incidence of warfare. This course studies war and society in Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries. It examines the reciprocal ways in which the conduct of warfare and the nature of the societies in which it occurs influence and transform each other.           Exclusion: HI 346H.

HI308       Renaissance Art
                Fall term
                Instructor: TBA
                MW 2:30 - 3:50 pm

A study of Italian and Northern Renaissance art with special emphasis on Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and Durer.  Also, a survey of Venetian Art and Mannerism throughout the 16th century.             Exclusions: FI301n, FI316

HI315        East Central Europe in the 20th Century
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Eva Plach
                TR 10:00 - 11:20 am

This course surveys the 20th-century histories of the countries of Eastern Europe. Topics to be covered may include: the creation of independent states in the aftermath of World War I; the collapse of interwar democracies; World War II and the Holocaust; the establishment of Communist regimes in the postwar period; and anti-Communist protest movements.   

HI316      Europe & New World 1450 - 1660
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. David Smith
                MWF 1:30 - 2:20 pm   

This course will examine the intellectual, social, economic, religious and political forces prompting the exploration of the New World of the Americas.  The impact of the encounter between the peoples of the New World and the Europeans will be studied.           

HI317      Golden Age Spain    .
                Winter term
                Instructor: Dr. Darryl Dee
                MWF 10:30 - 11:20

This course examines the history of Spain and its Empire during what historians call their Golden Age
©. 1492-1700).  It focuses on three basic questions: why was Spain the first country to create an empire extending across the globe; what were Spain’s strengths and weaknesses as an imperial power; and how did the imperial experience affect the development of Spanish society and culture?

HI325       Imperialism/Race/Post-Colonial
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Amy Milne-Smith
                MWF 11:30 - 12:20 pm

This course will consider the origins and development of racism in the modern metropolitan and colonial cultures of the 18th and 19th centuries.  It will study how the two world wars of the 20th century modified racist ideology and practice, and will conclude by examining how global migration , movements of colonial independence and civil rights, and the process of decolonization have shaped the postcolonial present.         Exclusions: HI346l

HI332      Foreign Relations of the US in the 20th Century
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Nelson Joannette
                MW 2:30 - 3:50 pm

This course addresses the contours and complexities of American foreign policy in the 20th century. It focuses especially on the post-1930s period and on the various U.S. military “interventions” that took place during this time, from America’s entry into the Second World War to the “War on Terror.”

HI341      Canadian Military History   
                Winter term
                Instructor: Dr. Roger Sarty
                MW 5:30 - 6:50 pm

A study of selected aspects of Canada's military experience.   

HI346H    War, Religion and Politics 1529 - 1714
                Winter term
                Dr. David Smith
                MW 4:00 - 5:20 pm

This course surveys the rise of Britain from a disparate group of medieval kingdoms, including England,Scotland and Ireland, to a world power. We trace how British institutions and culture were shaped as these nations merged into a modern state, expanded militarily and came to “rule the waves” as the leading European power. Three major topics organize the course: the Protestant Reformation and the development of religious toleration; constitutional transformation and the emergence of parliamentary supremacy; and the origin and expansion of Britain’s Atlantic empire. From these topics students are invited to consider a range of problems, including the connections between religious belief and the state, the significance of English political innovations to modern Anglo-Atlantic parliamentary government, and the effect of empire on ideas of nationhood.


HI346R      Public History
                Fall term
                Instructor: TBA
                MW 5:30 - 6:50 pm

The Practice of Public History (HI346J) takes an in-depth look at the many and diverse ways in which history is applied to real-world issues. By creatively linking classroom topics with community experience, students learn how history can be made relevant and useful in the public sphere.

Students deepen and apply the methods and skills of public history through a placement in one of the many organizations that bring history to life in Waterloo Region and beyond. Reflecting the multi-faceted nature of public history, the diverse placement options include exhibit planning, archival research, media relations, educational content development, website development, and serving as a museum docent.           

HI346S     History of the Body in Canada
                Fall term
                Instructor: Whitney Wood
                MWF 12:30 - 1:20 pm

This course focuses on the social and cultural history of the body in Canada from the beginning of the nineteenth century through the post-World War II period to approximately 1970. By surveying the history of bodies and embodiment in Canada, we will explore how the history of the body is intertwined with wider developments in social, cultural, political, military, and economic history. Topics to be discussed include health and medicine, the gendered body, sexuality and reproduction, racialized bodies, sport and sporting bodies, connections between individual bodies and the nation (especially during wartime), eugenics, and “deviant” bodies.


HI346T     North American Consumption form 1950
                Fall term
                Instructor: Andrea Gal
                TR 5:30 - 6:50 pm

This course explores the history of North American consumption practices from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Topics considered include: retailing, food, tourism, the automobile, electricity and domesticity, state regulation of consumption, alternatives to mainstream consumption practices, and the existence of a Canadian consumer culture.

HI346U   “Citizens at War; A Socio-cultural History of Life on the Home Front”
                Winter term
                Instructor: Michelle Filice
                MWF 11:30 - 12:20 pm

This course explores how the First and Second World Wars influenced and altered the lives of Canadian, British and American civilians who did not take up arms. It looks at the ways in which political, economic, and socio-cultural identities were shaped by the experience of two world wars. Topics covered in lectures and readings include: the roles of women and children, internment, medicine and disease, labour's home front, citizenship and political change, and memory and commemoration.

HI346V     The Middle Ages in Film
                Winter term
                Instructor: Alicia Mckenzie
                TR 4:00 - 5:20 pm

This course introduces students to a new and exciting research area: Medievalism, that is, the study of how generations after the Middle Ages have perceived this mysterious period in history. For many, the Medieval era seems vast and distant. Many people tend to harbour romantic ideas about it. Through comparing ideas and experiences from the Middle Ages, such as heroism, kingship, mysticism, and myth, with depictions of related ideas and experiences in films such as The Thirteenth Warrior, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and The Passion of Joan of Arc, this course will ideally broaden a students’ thinking about the Middle Ages and about the role of popular culture in forming assumptions about history.

HI346X      Armenians, Ottomans & Genocide
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Gavin Brockett
                R 4:00 - 6:50 pm

This course will be delivered in the Active Learning Classroom and students must expect to be active participants on a weekly basis.  The purpose of the course is to consider the importance of a historical approach to the study of crimes against humanity.  We will study what happened to the Ottoman Christian population during World War I, and the different arguments that have been put forward by those who conclude this constituted genocide and those who claim otherwise.  Students will apply a critical approach to both the scholarly literature and some of the available sources, and they will consider the implications today of studying an event that remains important one century after the fact.


HI349        International Relations from 1890 to 1991   
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Leonard Friesen
                W 10:00 - 12:50 pm

This course analyses the intensifying economic and strategic struggle among the Great Powers, which led to the two World Wars and the Cold War. It will focus on the stages by which the European system became absorbed into a global system, the revolutionary challenges to the status quo and the responses to them.         Exclusion: GS349

HI354       France in World War II: Origins and History of the Vichy Regime
                Winter term
                Instructor: Dr. Michael Sibalis
                MW 2:30 - 3:50 pm

After the defeat of May-June 1940, France experienced four years of German occupation. A conservative and collaborationist French government, headquartered in the town of Vichy and headed by Marshal Philippe Pétain, sought to transform the country’s institutions and society by means of a “national revolution.”  This course begins with the background to the Vichy period through an examination of the crises of the 1920s and 1930s.  It then looks at the reasons for the military debacle of 1940 and the political collapse of France’s Third Republic (1870-1940).  Topics for the Vichy period include the National Revolution, the government’s collaborationist policies, daily life under German occupation, the fate of French Jews, the Catholic Church, the condition of women, the growth of resistance movements at home and abroad, and the Liberation of 1944.

Assignments include a midterm test written in class, a short paper, a research essay and a final examination.  

HI359       Paris: History of a Capital City
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Michael Sibalis
                TR 1:00 - 2:20 pm

The city of Paris – which dates back to at least the 1st Century B.C. (when the Romans called it Lutetia) –  has dominated France for the past one thousand years and has ranked as a city of global importance for at least the last three centuries.  The 20th-Century German philosopher Walter Benjamin even dubbed Paris the “capital of the 19th Century” because he considered it the birthplace of modernity.  Paris’s history is therefore a long and complex one, which is often difficult to disentangle from the history of France as a whole.  This course focuses on the story of the city itself.  It examines the birth, growth and urban development of Paris over the last two millennia, as well as selected aspects of politics, culture, and daily life in the metropolis within the wider context of French, European  and global civilization.  It consequently covers a wide variety of topics – such as class conflict, municipal politics, architecture, city planning and urban renewal, criminality, popular and elite culture, art, architecture and mass consumerism.

HI360      Great War Aftermath 1914-1921

                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Terry Copp
                MW 4:00 - 5:20 pm

This lecture/discussion course deals with many of the major issues arising in and around World War I.  Multi-media lectures, films and readings will cover the following topics: cause of the war, changing war aims, tactics and strategy, battlefield experience, home fronts, wartime diplomacy, the break-up of empires, the emergence of new states, and peacemaking.         Exclusions: HI346m

HI364        The Holocaust and Nazi Germany         
                Winter term  
                Instructor: Dr. Erich Haberer
                W 9:30-12:20 pm

This course examines Jewish-Gentile relations in Europe from the mid-18th century to 1938. Topics will include Jewish emancipation and acculturation, anti-Jews sentiment and violence, modern racial and national ideologies, Fascist and National Socialist antisemitism, and the dis-emancipation of Jews in Nazi Germany that foreshadows the Holocaust.         Exclusions:  HI365*

HI379        The Third World Since 1945
                Fall Term
                Instructor: Dr. Jeff Grischow
                MWF 12:30 - 1:20 pm

This course will examine the rise and fall of the ideology of the “Third World” after 1945 within the context of postwar global history. Topics will include decolonization and revolutions in Africa, Asia and Latin America, the development project in the global south, the origins and course of the ideology of “Third Worldism” as a tool of nonalignment, and the legacy of decolonization in the postcolonial world.
Exclusions      HI329*.

HI386        The Vietnam Wars
                Winter term
                Instructor: Dr. Blaine Chiasson
                TR 11:30 - 12:50 pm

The wars in Vietnam represented more than just struggles between peoples; they embodied the forces that forged the twentieth century: colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, revolution, modernization, nation-building, development, the clash of cultures, capitalism, communism, the cold war, and more.  This course studies both Vietnam’s anti-colonial struggle with France and North Vietnam’s long war with the United States.  It is designed to explain the wars and their outcomes, create understanding about the reasons why crucial decisions were or were not made, and reveal the larger forces at work within these most twentieth-century of conflicts.  Exclusion: HI346k

HI387        American Protest Music
                Winter term
                Instructor: Dr. Darren Mulloy
                TR 4:00 - 5:20 pm

This course examines the history of American protest music from the 1930s onwards.  Topics to be considered include civil rights, black power, anti-war movements and opposition to capitalism through such figures as Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Billie Holiday, Gil-scot Heron and Public Enemy.

HI398       The Historian’s Craft   
                Fall term
                Instructor: Dr. Adam Crerar
                TR 8:30 - 9:50 am

History 398 is a course about the many different ways historians think and do their work.  Through a combination of lectures, workshops, and seminars, the course explores a range of matters associated with the writing of history, including: how the practice of history has changed over time; the nature of historical sources; how historians claim to know about the past; the differences and relationships between history and memory; and the major approaches to understanding the past that have influenced the writing of history today. Throughout, the emphasis is on making explicit, and more comprehensible, the various ways in which historians explore the past.
Prerequisite:  Registration status: Year 3 or Year 4 Honours History, or permission of the department.