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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
December 22, 2014

Canadian Excellence

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NO211


Canadian Identities and Cultures

This lecture/tutorial course examines how class, gender, race, and a sense of place contribute to the dynamic process of identity construction in Canada. The concepts of community and region are examined, and a series of case studies reveal how identity formation takes place across Canada, both in contemporary and historical terms.The significance of race and racism is central to the course and is explored using film and interdisciplinary scholarship.

NO211 is open to all senior level Laurier students. The course is required for students pursuing a joint-major honours program in North American Studies in the Canadian Studies stream and for those pursuing a Canadian Studies minor.

In 2012/13, the course is offered in the fall term on Mondays from 9:30 am to 12:20 pm. The course is taught by Dr. Kevin Spooner.


Course Overview

Is there a 'Canadian' identity? Would such an identity be useful? Beneficial? Dangerous? Would it be more correct to speak of Canadian identities? If so, how would such identities be constructed, and by whom? This course examines the many issues and assumptions that underpin these very questions.

Class, gender, race, and a sense of place are all factors contributing to the dynamic process of identity construction in Canada. NO211 begins by exploring notions of community and region, and then in a series of case studies questions how identity formation and construction takes place across Canada, both contemporarily and in the past (British Columbia, the Prairies, Northern and Southern Ontario, and the Atlantic Provinces). The impact of and meaning of 'race' in these various locations is a primary focus, explored using film and interdisciplinary scholarship.

Course Syllabus:

The current course syllabus, as well as course syllabi from previous years, are posted as they are available on the Course Outlines page of the program website.