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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
April 16, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

200-/300-level Courses, 2013-14



Note 1: 300-level FS courses are restricted to students who have at least 1.0 credit in FS courses.

Note 2: The Department cannot add students into full courses even if they are needed to fulfill graduation requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to put themselves on course waitlists as early in the Spring registration period as possible.

Note 3: Students who arrive at the beginning of term without having made any course selections will be advised to add themselves into open courses and onto the waitlist of closed courses, even if that means they don't acquire all of the English courses they'd planned to take.

Warnings

The university reserves the right to remove you at any time from any courses that you have registered for contrary to the regulations. For example, if you register in more courses than allowed, in courses for which you have exclusions, in courses for which you lack prerequisites or in courses which are inappropriate due to any other university regulation, the university reserves the right to remove you even after classes have begun. Nevertheless, it is your responsibility to make the appropriate selections. The university does not guarantee that your errors will be caught.

Course

Number

Title

Term

Day / Time

CRN

Instructor

234

Hollywood Auteurs

F

Lecture: TR 11:30-12:50

4031

Screening: W 7:00-9:50

4032

A study of the development of the themes and techniques in the work of at least three major film directors whose work is or was produced primarily within Hollywood. Special consideration will be given to directors who have been lauded as auteurs despite working within the collaborative environment of the Hollywood industry. Filmmakers to be studied may include Howard Hawks, John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Steven Spielberg and Kathryn Bigelow.

Exclusion: FS243

 

238

Bollywood Film

F

Lecture: TR 10:00-11:20

4033

Dr. J.J. Chang

Screening: T 7:00-9:50

4034

An overview of Bollywood, one of the world’s largest and the most prolific film industries. Consideration will be given to the history of Bollywood films, the global appropriation of cinematic techniques characteristic of Bollywood, and the influence of Bollywood on representations of India in Western and diasporic cinemas.

 

240

Film History to 1950

W

Lecture: W 7:00-9:50

1794

A. Bergstrom

Screening: T 7:00-9:50

1795

This course will survey the history of film from its beginnings in the 1890s to around 1950. We will consider the various technological, ideological, socio-cultural, and economic factors that shaped the experience of film during this period. Along the way, we will explore a number of film movements, technological innovations, genres, and national cinemas, including German Expressionism, Soviet Montage, classical Hollywood cinema, and Italian neorealism. The historical focus of the course will give us the opportunity to examine different models of history and how they shape our sense of the film medium.

 

241

Film History Since 1950

F

Lecture: TR 1:00-2:20

2567

Dr. J.J. Chang

Screening: W 7:00-9:50

2568

This course surveys the history of primarily narrative film since 1950. We will explore various national movements and their transnational repercussions within industrial, technological, aesthetic, political and socio-cultural contexts. Film traditions, trends and genres to be examined may include the French New Wave, Italian Neo-realism, American Avant-Garde, New Hollywood, and Bollywood musicals. We will also explore such important questions as: What is film history? What do film historians do? And how do we write film history?

246

German Film

W

Lecture: MW 2:30-3:50

3692

 

Screening: M 7:00-9:50

3693

A study of major works (with English subtitles) of the German cinema, from the silent period to the present.

249

Detective Film

W

Lecture: TR 4:00-5:20

3694

Dr. P. Gates

Screening: T 7:00-9:50

3695

This course offers an exploration of the evolution of the detective film from the silent era through to the contemporary criminalist film. Selected films will be screened and analyzed in relation to questions of gender, class, race, law, and crime. The course explores the social, historical, and economic contexts that define and shape the various subgenres of the detective film. For example, World War II and post-war readjustment incited gender shifts in American society that were presented and processed through 1940s film noir (e.g., Laura [1944]). Similarly, the shift from a system of self-censorship to a ratings system in the late 1960s allowed for different kinds of representation of sexuality and violence including the vigilante cop film (e.g., Dirty Harry [1971]). Shifts within the film industry and American society in general have redefined the representation of masculinity, femininity, race, heroism, villainy, and the law and this course will explore those representations in the American detective film.

253

Gangster Film

W

Lecture: MW 4:00-5:20

3698

 

Screening: T 7:00-9:50

3699

A study of the development of themes and techniques in the gangster genre since 1930, with special attention to its cultural, social and political contexts.

Exclusion: FS353

257

The Western

W

Lecture: TR 11:30-12:50

3700

 

Screening: W 7:00-9:50

3701

This course offers students an exploration of the evolution of the American western (and some international alternatives) from the silent period to contemporary film. Although the historical period of "The West" lasted only approximately 30 years, its myth has pervaded in a century of film. The genre has evolved through distinct cycles, each representing a shift in the ideas of gender, race, expansionism, and nationhood. This course also explores the social, historical, and economic contexts that define and shape the various trends and shifts in the western genre. For example, the shift from a system of self-censorship to a ratings system in the late 1960s allowed for different kinds of representation for sexuality and violence and brought about a new cycle of the genre. Similarly, different modes of production affected the development of the genre with the European-made "spaghetti western" offering a shift in the look and themes of the genre, which then had an influence on Hollywood’s films. Shifts within the film industry and American society redefined the representation of masculinity, femininity, heroism, villainy, and race in film and this course will explore those representations in the Hollywood western film.

260

Youth Culture in Film

F

Lecture: MW 4:00-5:20

4035

 

Screening: M 7:00-9:50

4036

An examination of the cinematic representation and/or production of the ‘dark side’ of post-WWII youth-oriented popular culture in a broad selection of Hollywood and international films.

Exclusion: FS343Q

270

The Animated Film

F

Lecture: TR 4:00-5:20

4037

Dr. S. Annett

Screening: T 7:00-9:50

4038

Film historian Donald Crafton argues that animation since its beginnings has been characterized by its tendency towards "self-figuration": its depictions of the materials and processes of animation itself. This course surveys the history of world animation by presenting works that reflexively depict the animation or "bringing to life" of characters, animators, audiences, and technologies. Students will learn how animation has been produced in various historical periods and places, and how audiences engage with it through changing media. Works to be screened typically include popular short and feature-length theatrical films from Pinocchio (1940) to Paprika (2006), episodes from classic television series such as The Jetsons (1962), and works in the emerging field of Flash animation such as Sita Sings the Blues (2008). But be aware: studying animation, while fun, is not always easy! Students will be expected to complete a major research paper for this course involving independent reading of academic sources, along with exams and smaller assignments.

 

300-level courses are open to students who have taken

at least 1.0 credit in FS courses

 

309d

Legacy of Orson Welles

F

Lecture: R 5:30-7:20

3897

Dr. P. Heyer

Screening: R 7:30-8:50

3901

Tutorial: R 9:00-9:50

3900

Few artists of the twentieth century have achieved renown in such a variety of media as Orson Welles. Today he is best known as a filmmaker - Citizen Kane (1941) tops almost every critics best picture list-but during the 1930's Welles stunned Broadway with his theatrical productions and then terrified millions with his radio version of H. G. Wells's, The War of the Worlds done in a live newscast style.

This course will focus primarily on Welles career as a filmmaker-how he was wooed by and then ostracized from Hollywood, only to emerge as a legendary "independent" whose influence is still being felt. However, during the first weeks of the semester we will consider his earlier work in theatre, radio, along with the radical politics that underscored is artistic vision.

NOTE: This course is cross-listed with CS 340m. Enquiries about this course should be directed to the Communication Studies Department

 

344

American Film Since 1969

F

Lecture: TR 2:30-3:50

4039

Dr. P. Gates

Screening: T 7:00-9:50

4040

This course offers students a survey of more than three decades of American film and explores the development of the contemporary film industry, its product, and marketing strategies as well as the audience’s consumption of that product. This course addresses Hollywood and some alternatives to it, including Blaxploitation and independent filmmaking. Students will perform close textual analysis of specific films, exploring issues of aesthetics and representation; however, students will also investigate the commercial, historical, political, and economic contexts that affect and govern the production of American film. The aim of the course is to expose students to different approaches—historical, sociological, and analytical—to the study of post-classical American film. Topics covered by this course include race, gender, genre, politics, history, auteurism, stardom, merchandising, audiences, and animation.

345

Film Theory & Mass Media

W

Lecture: TR 2:30-3:50

3704

Dr. S. Annett

Screening: W 7:00-9:50

3705

Since the earliest days of cinema, film commentators have asked: is film an art form or a commercial product? Is it a revolutionary creative expression? A means of active identity-building among audiences? Or is it part of a mass media "culture industry" that operates through ideological manipulation? This course provides students with a solid theoretical basis for addressing such divisive questions about film, art, and mass media. It addresses theories of film itself as art and popular culture, as well as film’s intersections with other mass media forms such as reality television, music videos, advertising, and social networking. Some topics to be addressed are the "languages" of film and new media, convergence culture, globalization, and fan cultures. Key films may include Metropolis (1927), Fantasia (1940), The Truman Show (1998), and The Matrix (1999). Students will be expected to complete a major research paper for this course involving independent reading of academic sources, along with exams and smaller assignments.

346

Film Theory & Gender

F

Lecture: MW 2:30-3:50

4041

Screening: M 7:00-9:50

4042

An introduction to gender theory and film through the reading of primary theoretical texts and the screening of films from a range of periods.

Exclusion: FS343s

366

The Cinematic City

W

Lecture: TR 10:00-11:20

3706

Dr. R. Kilbourn

Screening: M 7:00-9:50

3707

At the intersection of film and cultural studies, this course looks at a wide selection of representative European, North American, and Asian films in order to explore evolving notions of individual and social identity within the largely visually determined subjective and objective spaces of capitalist modernity. In this course, urban space and architecture will be broadly construed to include structures as diverse as the utopian metropolis of German Expressionism, the destroyed city of the post-war film, Jacques Tati’s suburban Parisian playground, the mean streets of cinematic New York, and the hyper-urban dystopias of Science Fiction. At the same time, the question of cinematic identity will be explored across genre boundaries through the sub-genre of the ‘city film’ as it transforms in the shift from national to transnational cinematic practices.