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Wilfrid Laurier University Leaf
September 1, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Current Projects


2009-2012

This section provides an overview of ongoing research activities.

 


BOOK SERIES

A series of three edited volumes is being prepared for publication.

Freymond, N. & Cameron, G. (2006). Towards positive systems of child and family welfare: International comparisons of child protection, family service, and community care models. Toronto, On: University of Toronto Press

Cameron, G., Coady, N. &, Adams, G. (2007). Moving toward positive systems of child and family welfare: Current issues and future directions. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Volume 3 to be announced in 2011.

 



LONG-TERM COMMUNITY ADAPTATION OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES PARTICIPATING IN RESIDENTIAL AND INTENSIVE FAMILY SERVICE CHILDREN'S MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS


 

Over the past 6 years, the PCFP has been following how well youth leaving residential treatment and intensive family services programs in 5 children’s mental health organizations in Ontario are doing in several areas of their lives—school and employment, social integration, family living and youth well being. There is little information about the long-term life trajectories of children and adolescents after they leave services. How do younger children leaving these programs handle the challenges of adolescence and high school? How do adolescents leaving these programs fare in the worlds of education, employment, and adult relationships? What happens to these families as their children cross major developmental thresholds?

So far what we have learned is that almost all of the 212 youth in this study were struggling with school attendance and performance, delinquency, and disruptions in family life at the time of entry to residential treatment or intensive family service programs. At program discharge, most youth showed significant improvements in how they were doing in these areas. However, the challenge seems to be maintaining these positive changes over time.  In our follow up discussions with families and youth approximately 1 1/2 years and 3 years after program discharge, many youth still faced daily challenges in several life domains. In fact, difficulties with staying in school and getting into trouble with the law were more concerning overall at follow up than at admission to these programs.

To view results from Phase 1 and Phase 2 see our Life Domain Research Report Series.

NEW! Funding has been awarded to support Phase 3 of this research until 2014.

 


EXPLORING LOCAL SYSTEMS OF CARE THAT FOSTER SUCCESSFUL COMMUNITY ADAPTATION FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH WITH EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL DIFFICULTIES

Flowing from our study of the long term functioning of youth participating in residential and intensive family services programs, the focus of this synthesis review will be on understanding the capacity of systems of care and integrated program models to foster successful community adaptation for children and youth with serious emotional and behavioural difficulties. The driving motivation behind this research, besides providing a useful summary of available knowledge and evidence, is to abstract ideas and examples that policy developers and service providers can use to create and assess positive innovations in systems of care for this group of youth. A primary undertaking will be evaluating and synthesizing the available evidence about the impacts of systems of care and integrated programming in four domains of living – school and employment, community integration, family living and youth well being.

Funded by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services, this synthesis review research project will take place over the next 12 months. Results will be publicized in various formats in early 2012.