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Wilfrid Laurier University Leaf
April 16, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Annual Teaching Day 2005



Biography:


Dr. Malgorzata (Gosha) Zywno is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Ryerson University in Toronto, with a cross appointment in the Learning and Teaching Office. Dr. Zywno has taught at Ryerson since 1982.

Dr. Zywno is passionate about teaching, and her focus on students and their learning is complemented by her research interests, which include active, collaborative learning in a technology-rich environment, faculty development, and recruitment and retention strategies for women in engineering. She has taught courses and offered keynote addresses and workshops at universities across Canada and in France, Germany and Scotland.

Dr. Zywno has won numerous teaching and achievement awards at university, province, national and international levels, including 3M Teaching Fellowship (2002), OCUFA Teaching Award (2003), The Learning Partnership's Technology Innovation Award (2004), Canadian Engineers' Medal for Distinction in Engineering Education (2005) and the American Association of Engineering Education (ASEE) Sharon Keillor Award for Women in Engineering Education (2005). As well, she was selected by a popular students' vote, as 2005 Ryerson IEEE Professor of The Year. Dr. Zywno's research and publications on the issues of technology-mediated teaching, active learning and learning styles have also won several awards, including the 2003 ASEE Conference & Exposition Best Conference Paper, and four Best Paper Awards at the UNESCO International Centre for Engineering Education Conferences (1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002).


Time Event Location
8:30 a.m. -
9 a.m.
Registration/Refreshments 1st Floor Foyer,
Bricker Academic (BA) Building
9 a.m. -
9:30 a.m.
Welcome
Overview of Educational Development
Sandy Hughes, Director: Teaching Support Services
BA201
9:30 a.m. -
10 a.m.
Getting Connected: Information Technology Services (ITS)
Andrzej Gadmonski, Manager: Client Services, ITS/ John Kearney, Acting Director, ITS
BA201
10 a.m. -
10:45 a.m.
Crticial Incidents in Teaching: Educational Technology and You
ITS/MTR/ED staff
BA201
10:45 a.m. - 11:05 a.m. Refreshment Break 1st Floor Lounge, BA
11:05 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Keynote: Dr. Malgorzata (Gosha) Zywno
Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ryerson University
Title: Student Engagement or How to Survive and Thrive in a Large Class
BA201
12:20 p.m. - 12:25 p.m. Welcoming Remarks - Dr. Sue Horton, VP Academic BA201
12:25 p.m. - 1:20 p.m. Lunch 1st Floor,
Science Building Foyer
1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Concurrent Session 1
C1: Assessing Students ina Course with a Large Collaborative Learning Component,
Dr. Gosha Zywno, Ryerson University
BA110
C2: Developing Effective Course Syllabi,
Dr. Catherine Black, Languages and Literatures and Jeanette McDonald, Educational Development Manager
BA111
C3: Accessing a Charismatic Presence,
Dr. Leslie O'Dell, English
BA101
C4: It's a Matter of Time: Transitioning Between Timeslots (60, 90, 180 mins). Challenges and Opportunities,
Dr. Mercedes Rowinsky, Languages and Literatures;
Dr. Philippa Gates, English and Film Studies;
Dr. David Docherty, Dean of Arts/Associate Professor, Political Science
BA112
2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. Refreshment Break Lounge, 1st Floor, BA
2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. Concurrent Session 2
C1: Co-ordinating and Teaching Multi-sectioned Courses: Realities and Resolutions,
Professor Trent Tucker and Dr. Bob McDonald, Psychology
BA110
C2: Promoting Academic Integrity: Challenges and Opportunities,
Dr. Mark Baetz, School of Business and Economics
BA111
C3: Accessing a Charismatic Presence,
Dr. Leslie O'Dell, English
BA101
C4: Using Rubrics to Save Grading Time and Support Student Learning,
Dr. Dana Sawchuk, Sociology
BA112
4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Barbecue The Quad
(across from Macdonald House Residence)



KEYNOTE:
Student Engagement or How to Survive, and Thrive, in a Large Class

As class sizes continue to grow, the goal of keeping the students engaged and feeling that their opinions count can be very challenging. In this talk, a range of strategies supporting involvement of students with a variety of learning styles will be discussed. They include group activities, student feedback, role-playing, games, demonstrations, peer presentations, guest talks, online access to self-assessment tools, interactive multimedia and discussion boards that can be used to extend student engagement beyond the classroom by providing not only the means for review and improved counseling by an instructor, but importantly, opportunities for peer tutoring as well. Dr. Zywno will provide examples of successful implementations of that model, including her own experiences from teaching a large class of engineering students. A short overview of the Felder Learning Styles Model will be presented, as well as video clips of class activities and a "tour" of discussion board activities.

Critical Incidents in Teaching: Educational Technology and You
ITS/MTR/ED staff

Murphy's Law - If something can go wrong, it will go wrong. The key to avoiding disaster is planning ahead and having a Plan B. This rule applies well to the classroom, especially when using educational technology in day-to-day teaching. In this session we will explore one or more video scenarios (time permitting) in which a professor experiences multiple dilemmas associated with their use of instructional technology. Strategies to prepare and respond to technology hiccups and getting connected to the network will be discussed. Supports for faculty and students will also be highlighted.

Getting Connected: Information Technolgoy services
Andrzej Gadmonski, Manager: Client Services, ITS; John Kearney, Acting Director, ITS
This session will help you to better understand IT services at Laurier. The presentation will familiarize you with the ITS Department structure, staff, size and services offered. Information provided during this session will be helpful for your academic, administrative and personal planning. Such an overview will be beneficial when you are going to be looking for help, solutions or support in the future. ITS would like to help all the clients (students, faculty and staff) in the most efficient and effective way. Your feedback is always welcome.



Concurrents:

Assessing Students in a Course with a Large Collaborative Learning Component - Dr. Malgorzata (Gosha) Zywno, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ryerson University

Collaborative learning engages, motivates and empowers students, and promotes communication and evaluation skills. Yet strategies required for its successful implementation need to be carefully planned. Collaborative learning does not equate putting students in groups and leaving them to their own resources. Taking on the role of a guide can be as time-consuming, or more, as conventional lecturing. The instructor has to actively coach teams, be aware of team dynamics, prepared to engage in conflict resolution and develop safeguards to deter loafing and disingenuous peer-assessment. In this talk, Dr. Zywno will share her experiences with adopting collaborative strategies, replacing conventional testing with semester-long projects, including peer-assessment, and with blending process-oriented and content-oriented outcomes. Her presentation will include short video clips of group activities and of interviews presenting students' point of view.


Using Rubrics to Save Grading Time and Support Student Learning - Dana Sawchuk, Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University

Instructors are often wary of assigning essays in classes because they fear that providing adequate feedback to students will take too much time. Using rubrics for assessment, however, enables instructors to spend a reasonable amount of grading time to provide students with detailed comments on assignments. Rubrics can also be a means for instructors to articulate learning outcomes and expectations for student writing before assignments are due. Further, rubrics help to ensure that each studentís assignment is assessed consistently, whether it is the first, twentieth, or one hundredth paper marked (and regardless of whether the instructor or a marking assistant is doing the grading). In this session, I discuss how I have used rubrics to assess student writing in classes ranging from 150 to 450 students. I showcase two samples of rubrics I have used in the past (a rudimentary checklist-style rubric and a more elaborate grid-style rubric). I discuss how I developed each of these rubrics, what my experience has been using them and how they have been received by students and marking assistants, and how they could be refined or adapted for other courses in the future.


Accessing a Charismatic Presence - Leslie O'Dell, English, Wilfrid Laurier University

Auditorium. Lecture Theatre. Stadium. Whether the classroom is new and specifically designed for teaching large numbers, or a converted space originally designed for concerts and convocation, the relationship between students and professor bears a remarkable similarity to that of an audience and actors. For that reason alone, techniques borrowed from the theatre can enhance the experience of students and faculty. In this interactive workshop, participants will discover how they might access an authentic and highly energized charisma that enables a dynamic human presence of sufficient scale to balance the impersonal, technology dominated mega classroom. We'll explore voice, gesture, movement, and facial expressions, as well as relaxation techniques, microphone phobia, and stage fright.


Developing Effective Course Syllabi - Dr. Catherine Black, Languages and Literatures and Jeanette McDonald, Educational Development Manager

Your course syllabus is a communication tool (and contract of sorts) that provides a mechanism to inform students of what the course is about (e.g., content, objectives), how the course will proceed (e.g. time frame, policies), important course information (e.g. assessment, schedules), and your expectations for students (e.g. classroom management). Taking the time to develop a comprehensive syllabus and review it with your students during the first class meeting can save time and avoid complications (e.g. late assignments) later in the semester. During this session we will examine a selection of course syllabi and identify key elements to consider for inclusion in your outline. Handouts, including a syllabus checklist will be provided.


It's a Matter of Time: Transitioning Between Timeslots (60, 90, 180 mins). Challenges and Opportunities - Dr. Mercedes Rowinsky, Languages and Literatures; Dr. Philippa Gates, English and Film Studies; Dr. David Docherty, Dean of Arts/Professor, Political Science
At times we may not have much choice in the timeslots assigned to us for teaching. As such, you may find yourself having to teach a course, for example, that you originally designed for three 60-minute sessions now in one three-hour session instead. Does the teaching mission change according to your time? Will you be able to pace student learning and integrate media and group work as easily? How will you format your lectures? How will you modify your teaching to cover content and accommodate active learning opportunities? In this session three experienced instructors share their experiences, strategies and advice for transitioning and teaching in different timeslots.


Co-ordinating and Teaching Multi-sectioned Courses: Realities and Resolutions - Professor Trent Tucker, School of Business and Economics and Dr. Bob McDonald, Psychology
This session will focus primarily on issues that are relevant to the teaching and administration of large multi-section classes. These include, among others, strategies for coordination among faculty, standardization and structure across course sections in terms of evaluation and course material, and typical student requests/problems. We will be discussing these topics with reference to both the teaching of individual sections and overall course administration. Coming from two different faculties, we each have experience with a rather different approach to many of these issues, and hope to encourage an open discussion of the costs and benefits of a variety of responses to these situations.


Promoting Academic Integrity: Challenges and Opportunities - Dr. Mark Baetz, School of Business and Economics

This session will provide an overview of ethical issues relevant to teaching and learning, with a particular focus on issues of academic integrity. Acknowledging that the role of the instructor is a complex one, we will discuss various strategies, tools, and techniques that might be employed in dealing with the inherent challenges.