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October 2, 2014
 
 
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JOIN DR. RUSSELL KILBOURN AS HE LECTURES AT THE NEXT MEDIA ARTS MASH UP!

CULTURAL MEMORY, INDIGENOUS IDENTITY AND HD DIGITAL VIDEO: THE ISUMA FAST RUNNER TRILOGY

Nov 27/12

Contact:

Media Contact
Luiza Sadowski,Mississauga Arts Council Communications Coordinator
Telephone 905-615-4212
Email media@mississaugaartscouncil.com

MISSISSAUGA, ON – The Mississauga Arts Council (MAC) is excited to present their next Media Arts Mash Up on November 29th from 7-9 p.m. at the Art Gallery of Mississauga (300 City Centre Dr., Mississauga) in a lecture format! Admission is free. It will be led by Dr. Russell Kilbourn, an Associate Professor of English and Film Studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. The topic for the lecture will be Cultural Memory, Indigenous Identity and HD Digital Video: The Isuma Fast Runner Trilogy. Following the lecture, there will be a Q & A session, giving everyone in the audience an opportunity to ask questions and engage in the discussion.

Dr. Kilbourn publishes on film, cultural studies, and comparative literature and on the German author W.G. Sebald. His book, Cinema, Memory, Modernity: The Representation of Memory from the Art Film to Transnational Cinema, appeared with Routledge in 2010. He is also a series editor for the Film and Media Studies series at WLU Press, and is currently co-editing a collection of essays titled, The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film, forthcoming with WLU Press in 2013. 

In his lecture, Dr. Kilbourn will consider the work, The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, within a trans-indigenous context, appreciating and evaluating the film as a prime example of contemporary transnational art cinema as much as a masterwork of indigenous film. The point of this change in context, is to shed new light not merely on the film itself but also on the very question of the art of cinema today. At the same time, he wants to explore the myriad implications for cultural memory of the film’s marriage of cutting-edge digital video technology with ancient themes and folkways- in effect a pre-literate ‘oral’ culture translated seemingly wholesale to the screen. What is lost or distorted in this process? What is gained or changed for the better? Is it possible for a minority indigenous culture to survive, in a digital video afterlife, even after it has all but vanished in reality? In short, his approach considers these Inuit films in terms of the much larger question of cultural memory as it becomes trans-cultural, and national cinema as it becomes trans-national, while the local and ‘indigenous’, if not individual, find representation at a level of global legibility.

 More details can be found online at http://www.mississaugaartscouncil.com

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