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Wilfrid Laurier University Laurier's Brantford campus
July 22, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence
Haskell-WLU

Dr. David M. Haskell

Associate Professor, Digital Media and Journalism

Contact Information
Email: dhaskell@wlu.ca
Phone: 519.756.8228 ext.5808
Fax: 519.759.2127
Office Location: OD 201
Office Hours: By appointment (call or email to book a time)
Languages Spoken

English

Academic Background


·       Ph.D., Potchefstroom University (now North-West Univ.), Communication Studies

·        M.A., University of Western Ontario, Journalism

·        B.Ed., University of Toronto, English & Drama

·        B.A., University of Western Ontario, English & Philosophy

Biography

David's teaching and research focuses on religion in Canada, media in Canada, and religion AND media in Canada. He is currently studying growth and decline in Canada's churches.

Before academia, David was a journalist.  He started as a print features writer and later moved to TV working as a reporter in London, Windsor, and Waterloo Region. He has received awards from TV Ontario and the Radio Television News Directors Association (RTNDA) for his news reporting.

Before joining the faculty at Laurier-Brantford in 2005,  David spent four years as a professor of Journalism at Conestoga College in Kitchener, Ontario.  He has also enjoyed careers as a high school teacher, professional musician and motivational speaker.  

In addition to his academic publications, David continues to publish essays related to his academic research in the popular press.

SELECTED SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS 

Books authored:

Through a lens darkly: How the news media perceive and portray Evangelicals (Toronto, ON: Clements Academic, 2009).

Chapters in Books:

"Sun News a move in the “right” direction," in R.J. Brym (ed), New Society, 7th Edition (Toronto: Nelson, 2013).

“What's in a name?: The use of the term fundamentalist Christian in Canadian television news”, in S. Hoover & N. Kavina (eds), Fundamentalisms and the Media (New York, NY: Continuum, 2009) pp. 109-125.

Papers in Refereed Journals:

David M. Haskell and Kevin Flatt. (In Press). The Reported Impact of a Mainline Protestant Youth Rally and a Charismatic-Evangelical Youth Rally on Attendees’ Religious Faith—a phenomenological, comparative study. Journal of Youth Ministry. (40 pages)

 

(2013). "The theological meaning of Jesus’ resurrection: A content analysis of mainline and conservative Protestant Easter Sunday sermons." Journal of Empirical Theology, 25(2).

Haskell, D.M., Flatt, K., Lathangue, R. (2012). "Measuring the Effectiveness of a Church’s Off-line and On-line Marketing Campaign: The Case of the United Church of Canada’s“WonderCafe.” Journal of Communication and Religion, 35(2).

(2011). “What we have here is a failure to Communicate…”: Same-sex marriage, Evangelicals and the Canadian news media. Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, 23(3).

(2010). Evangelicals’ public face: Reflections on a flawed reflection. Evangelical Review of Society and Politics, 4(1): 42-58

Haskell, D.M., Paradis, K., Burgoyne, S., (2008). Defending the faith: Reaction to The DaVinci Code, The Jesus Papers, The Gospel of Judas and other pop culture discourses in Easter Sunday sermons. Review of Religious Research, 50(2): 139-156.

(2007). News media influence on non-Evangelicals’ perceptions of Evangelical Christians: A case study. Journal of Media and Religion, 6(3): 153-179.

(2007). Evangelical Christians in Canadian national television news, 1994-2004: A frame analysis. Journal of Communication and Religion, 30(1): 118-152.

For sample essays in the popular press, please see side bar on the left of the screen.

Additional Information

 Current Research Projects

Writing up the findings of a study of growth and decline in Canadian Mainline Protestant Churches. 

Research Interests

David Haskell's research interests include: Christian youth culture, Christianity and the media, evangelicals and evangelicalism, growth and decline in Canadian churches, frame theory and frame analysis, television news, and journalism pedagogy.