Site Accessibility Statement
Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
August 4, 2015
 
 
Canadian Excellence
Húsafell, Iceland, 2006

Dr. Anne Brydon

Associate Professor

Contact Information
Email: abrydon@wlu.ca
Phone: 519-884-0710 ext.3529#

Office Location: DAWB 4-147
Office Hours: Summer office hours by appointment only
Academic Background

PhD in Anthropology, McGill University 1992
MA in Anthropology, McMaster University 1987
BA Honours in Music, University of Western Ontario 1980

I engage in critical interpretive cultural analysis, with a focus on the cultural, political, and environmental legacies of modernity in Iceland and Canada. I trace these legacies by means of an interdisciplinary engagement with the dynamics of power and representation; with artistic re-imagining of changing social relations with nature, science, and technology; and with literary, auditory, and visual environmental criticism. I continue to conduct multi-sited ethnographic and virtual fieldwork, in Iceland, Canada, and western Europe.

Since 1988, I have researched the cultural politics of environmental issues in Iceland. I first studied the nationalist framing of debates about whale hunting sparked by international protests against Iceland’s whaling industry. More recently, I have focused on the Icelandic environmental movement that arose to protest hydroelectric development in the highland wilderness at Kárahnjúkar. In other work, I co-edited with Sandra Niessen Consuming Fashion: Adorning the Transnational Body (Berg 1998). I have also written catalogue essays on several artists, including Eleanor Bond, Joan Perlman, William Eakin, Wanda Koop, and Louise Jonasson. In 2000 I curated At Last Sight, an exhibit (with catalogue) of photographic work by Arni Haraldsson, held at Museum London (Canada) and the Winnipeg Art Gallery of Manitoba.

Some of my publications may be viewed or downloaded via Scholars Commons @ Laurier and academia.edu.

Biography

Selected Publications

n.d. ”Reconciliation and Justice in Zacharias Kunuk's Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner." under review.

2015 "Queering the Modern: Kent Monkman and Urban Res Studies." Urban Res Studies: Kent Monkman. Waterloo: Robert Langen Art Gallery. Pp. 44-53.

2014 "Water and Tower Allegory." Patrick Mahon: Water Structures. Hamilton, Waterloo and Winnipeg: McMaster Museum of Art, Robert Langen Gallery and Gallery 1C03.

2012 "Generations in Iceland." Generation X Goes Global: Mapping A Youth Culture in Motion. Christine Henseler, editor. Routledge.

2010 "Sentience." Conversations with Landscape. Katrín Anna Lund and Karl Benediktsson, editors. Afterword by Tim Ingold, Farnham, UK: Ashgate.

2010 "Mourning Mothers and Seeing Siblings: Feminism and Place in The Juniper Tree." (with Pauline Greenhill) Fairy Tale Film and Cinematic Folklore: Fantastic Voyages, Monstrous Dreams, and Wonderful Visions. Pauline Greenhill and Sidney Eve Matrix, editors. Utah State University Press.

2009 "Fashion." Women's Folklore and Folklife: An Encyclopedia of Beliefs, Customs, Tales, Music, and Art. E. Locke and Vaughan, editors. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO. vol. 1.

2007 "And Earth of Water: The Art of Joan Perlman"/„Og Jörđin af Vatni: Listsköpun Joan Perlman"  Element: The Art of Joan Perlman. Icelandic translation by Steinunn Einarsdóttir, Jón Proppé and Hörđur Zophaniasson. Hafnarborg.

2006 "The Predicament of Nature: Keiko the Whale and The Cultural Politics of Whaling in Iceland." Anthropological Quarterly 79(2): 225-260.

2003 "Representations of Crime: Showing the Paintings of John Wayne Gacy in Winnipeg." (with Pauline Greenhill) Crime's Power: Anthropologists and the Ethnography of Crime. S. Kane and P. Parnell, editors. New York: Palgrave/St. Martin’s Press. Pp. 145-172.

2003 "Intimate Dwelling: Finding Our Way Home." Home Show. Winnipeg: Winnipeg Art Gallery. Pp. 19-27.

2002 "Reykjavík." Encyclopedia of Urban Cultures. Melvin Ember and Carol Ember, editors. New Haven: Human Relations Area Files. Vol 4, pp. 10-22.

2002 „Lýđrćđi lyktar af táragasi ţessa dagana" ("Democracy Smells of Teargas These Days"). Ţórunn Sigurđardóttir, translator. Tíđarandi í Aldarbyrjun (The Spirit of the New Millennium). Reykjavík: Lesbók and Atvík. Pp. 108-123.

2001 „Mótmćlt, Náttúra, og Módernisma" ("Protest, Nature and Modernism"). Brynhildur Björnsdóttir and Ţórunn Sigurđardóttir, translators. Tímarit Máls og Menningar (Journal of Language and Culture) 2(62): 45-49.

2001 "Dreams and Claims: Icelandic-Saulteaux Interactions in the Manitoba Interlake." Journal of Canadian Studies 36(2): 164-190. (reprinted in Icelandic-Canadian Magazine 58(3): 105-124).

1998 Anne Brydon and Sandra Niessen, eds. Consuming Fashion: Adorning the Transnational Body. Providence and Oxford: Berg Publishers.

1998 "Sensible Shoes." Consuming Fashion: Adorning the Transnational Body. Anne Brydon and Sandra Niessen, eds. Providence and Oxford: Berg Publishers.


Additional Information
Teaching schedule for 2015-16

Fall term 2015

EN220 Reading Culture                                         Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:00 - 11:20 am

An extension of the practices involved in reading written texts, literary and non-literary, to the interpretation of other cultural forms, (for example, film, graphics, TV programming). There will be some attention to theories that offer a general model for how meaning is constructed and exchanged.

CS403v Advanced Global Communication & Media                         Tuesdays 2:30 - 5:20 pm

In this course, students will engage in the multi- and interdisciplinary study of materiality and material culture in order to consider how people live through the things they produce and encounter in the world. A recent "material turn" across the humanities and social sciences has witnessed the surfacing of several critical movements intended to foreground the agency and affective abilities of matter, both living and non-living. These movements may have pivotal importance for understanding ecological and ethical conflicts between humans, as well as between humans and non-humans. Students will become conversant in the details of these movements which include, but are not limited to, new materialism, speculative materialism, thing theory, and actor-network theory. By emphasizing the complex temporal, spatial, and material overlappings of human and non-human life and matter, this course will explore how materiality has a social life not necessarily acknowledged in mainstream thought and action. Students will consider how a materialist approach might help improve understanding of the many processes of circulation, exploitation, and transformation that underscore entanglements of the human and non-human. By learning to trace the historical and cultural trajectories of objects and things, students will develop skills at charting the ways materials change over time and with use, examining the processes through which matter may be made to assemble, disassemble, transform, and even disappear, thus reinforcing or challenging hegemonic constructions of the human and the non-human.

Winter term 2016

HI290 History of Modern Art: Making It New                                 MWF 11:30 am - 12:20 pm

This course explores the styles, schools and movements of Western art during a dynamic period of innovation in art and social mores, from the 1860s to the 1960s. Among topics discussed are: art for art’s sake and the rise of the middle class; utopian architecture and design in the aftermath of two world wars; the avant-garde and social reform; and Pop Art and mass culture. Artistic activity is examined in relation to changing ideas, technologies and world history to consider why modern art is so different from what came before. (formerly HI299b)

MU310/HI389 Music, Sound and Environment                               MW 2:30 - 3:50 pm

An exploration of music and sound in relation to natural and human environments and environmental issues. Students will gain insight into the historical and contemporary ways music engages and defines nature, and develop an analytical approach to understanding and managing sonic environments. Topics may include: the pastoral; place-based music; music and environmental activism; preservation of soundscapes; noise pollution; sounds of transformation/devastation.