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Wilfrid Laurier University Laurier's Brantford campus
July 24, 2014
 
 
Canadian Excellence

Dr. Shelley Beal

Contract Academic Staff, Faculty of Liberal Arts

Contact Information
Email: sbeal@wlu.ca


Office Location: RCW 306
Office Hours: Intermittent, Tuesday to Friday
Biography

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Dr. Shelley Beal enjoying some book tourism in Stratford, Ontario

I am thrilled to be a part of this vibrant, innovative campus in the unique, resurgent city of Brantford, where I have family ties going back twenty years. Born in Guelph, I grew up in Scarborough, Ontario and entered undergraduate studies in French, German, and Spanish languages and literatures at the University of Toronto, spending a year in Québec City at Université Laval. It was fun to take German courses taught in French! After spending eight years in Berlin, which was still divided by the Cold War, I returned to Toronto to work as a bilingual corporate finance administrator, then as a commercial translator, as well as a fine food caterer and chef. When I was in my forties, academia called me back to U of T once more, to complete an MA and a doctorate in a relatively new interdisciplinary field that combined my varied interests regarding literature and the written word: language and translation; 19th-century literature and authorship; publishing and copyright history; bibliography and textual studies. A focus on the North American publications of French author Émile Zola and on early literary agents helped me tie it all together: how do texts cross borders between cultures? In what ways are cultural exchanges (through print, until recently the dominant medium) mediated by the participants, who work in the real world of social, political, financial, and legal constraints?

The best thing about being at Laurier Brantford is the chance to share my lifelong love of language and books with students, using this socio-historical, interdisciplinary approach to writing and reading, known variously as book history, the history of the book, or print culture studies. The Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture at the University of Toronto, launched in 2000, was the world’s first PhD-level degree designation in the field. http://bookhistory.ischool.utoronto.ca/

Book historians come from a variety of traditional academic disciplines and are interested in the ways societies communicate through the written or printed word, both in the past and into the digital present and future. We ask complex questions that are also of interest to Laurier Brantford's Contemporary Studies students, such as, “Do books and print have a cultural and social impact beyond their roles as mere containers of ideas?” and “In the 21st century, are books and libraries ‘history?’”

Two courses I especially enjoy teaching at Laurier Brantford are EN204, Strategies in Analysis of Effective Writing, and CT220, Contemporary Studies Methodologies. A print culture approach has also introduced students to new ways of interpreting the iconic texts of Shakespeare and Tolkien.

Here are the Canadian and international scholarly societies I belong to, and some of my research activities to date. See you in class, or browsing at a book sale!


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The Bibliographical Society of Canada / La Société bibliographique du Canada  http://www.bsc-sbc.ca/

The Canadian Association for the Study of Book Culture / L'Association canadienne pour l'étude de l'histoire du livre  http://casbc-acehl.dal.ca/main.htm

SHARP, the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing  http://www.sharpweb.org/


LANGUAGES


Near-native fluency in written and spoken French and German, working knowledge of written and spoken Spanish; some Italian; Old French and Latin.



PUBLICATIONS

Refereed Publications

“Translation and Re-Translation: The Memoirs of Eugénie de Montijo, Ex-Empress of France.” Mémoires du livre  / Studies in Book Culture 2.1 (2010): n.p. Web. http://www.erudit.org/revue/memoires/2010/v2/n1/

“‘La Fin du pillage des auteurs’: Louvigny de Montigny’s International Press Campaign for Authors’ Rights in Canada.” Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Cahiers de la Société bibliographique du Canada 43:1 (Spring 2005): 45-64. Print / Web.
http://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/bsc/article/view/18417/15349

Non-Refereed Publications

Articles
“The Serialization of Travail / Labor in Harper’s Weekly.” Bulletin of the Emile Zola Society 39-40 (April and October 2009): 28-34.

Nana – a Bookstore Première.” Bulletin of the Emile Zola Society 35-36 (April and October 2007): 12-16.

Encyclopædia Entries
Le Courrier des États-Unis.” In France and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History: A Multidisciplinary Encyclopedia, ed. Bill Marshall. 3 vols. Transatlantic Relations Series (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2005), 1:314-5.

“Louvigny de Montigny.” In France and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History: A Multidisciplinary Encyclopedia, ed. Bill Marshall. 3 vols. Transatlantic Relations Series (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2005), 2:835-36.

“Theodore Stanton.” In France and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History: A Multidisciplinary Encyclopedia, ed. Bill Marshall. 3 vols. Transatlantic Relations Series (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2005), 3:1089.

Book and Conference Reviews
 “Mary Ann Gillies. The Professional Literary Agent in Britain, 1880-1920.” Books in Review. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Cahiers de la Société bibliographique du Canada 46:1 (Spring 2008): 130-3.

“Priscilla Coit Murphy. What a Book Can Do: The Publication and Reception of Silent Spring.” Books in Review. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Cahiers de la Société bibliographique du Canada 44:2 (Fall 2006): 87-90.

 “SHARP Halifax 2005.” SHARP News (Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing) 14:4 (Autumn 2005): 4-6.

“Meredith L. McGill. American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting 1834-1853.” Books in Review. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Cahiers de la Société bibliographique du Canada 42:2 (Fall 2004): 89-92.


CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

“An Increased French Presence in the North American Review in the 1890s.” Authors, Printers, Publishers and Readers in Transcontinental and Transnational Context. The 66th Annual Meeting of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Société bibliographique du Canada, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University, May 30, 2011.

“Theodore Stanton, Editor-Syndicator: The European Correspondent, 26 May 1886 – 25 June 1887.” Thinking Beyond Borders: Print Culture and Digital Culture. The 63rd Annual Meeting
and Conference of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Société bibliographique du Canada, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, June 5, 2008.

“The Serialization of Émile Zola’s Travail / Labor in Harper’s Weekly, 1901.” Transferts littéraires France, Grande-Bretagne, États-Unis. Université de Paris 13, April 11, 2008.

“Commerce or culture? Re-situating the Nineteenth-Century Literary Agent.” Navigating Texts and Contexts. SHARP International Conference, Dalhousie University, Halifax, July 17, 2005.

“Mary vs. Hubert, Montreal 1906: A Victory for International Authors’ Rights under the Berne Convention and for an Emerging National Literature in Quebec.” Crossing Borders. SHARP International Conference, Institut d’histoire du livre, ENSSIB, Lyon, July 22, 2004.

“Louvigny de Montigny’s International Press Campaign to End Literary Counterfeiting in Quebec.” Publishing History. The 59th Annual Meeting and Conference of the Bibliographical Society of Canada / Société bibliographique du Canada, McMaster University, Hamilton, June 28, 2004.

“Émile Zola and the Typewriter, 1899.” Material Worlds. Colloquium of the Graduate Students in the Collaborative Program in Book History and Print Culture (BHPC), University of Toronto, April 24, 2004.