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Wilfrid Laurier University Faculty of Arts
December 20, 2014

Canadian Excellence

Dr. Kim Rygiel (On Sabbatical Jul 1/14 - Jun 30/15)

Associate Professor and Graduate Officer

Contact Information
Email: krygiel@wlu.ca
Phone: 519-884-0710 ext.2032

Office Location: 4-126, Dr Alvin Woods Building

Academic Background
  • B.A., (English Literature and Humanistic Studies), McGill University
  • M.A., (International Relations), Norman Paterson School of International Relations, Carleton University
  • Ph.D., (Political Science) York University

Areas

International relations and global politics

globalization and global governance
citizenship and migration
security studies
gender and international relations.
Biography

Kim Rygiel is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, teaches at the Balsillie School of International Affairs, and is a Research Associate with the International Migration Research Centre (IMRC) at Wilfrid Laurier University. Her research focuses on border security, migration and citizenship within North America and Europe.

Her publications includeGlobalizing Citizenship (UBC Press 2010; co-winner of the 2011 ENMISA Distinguished Book Award); Citizenship, Migrant Activism and the Politics of Movement,co-edited with Peter Nyers (Routledge 2012); and (En)Gendering the War on Terror: War Stories and Camouflaged Politics, co-edited with Krista Hunt(Ashgate 2006). She is the author of several book chapters and has published in Citizenship Studies, Review of Constitutional Studies, European Journal of Social Theory (online, print forthcoming)and International Political Sociology (forthcoming).

She is Assistant Editor of Citizenship Studies

Additional Information

Willing to supervise M.A. and Ph.D students working in the areas of:

citizenship and migration; globalization and governance;international relations (IR) (including IR theory; gender and IR); and security studies, with a particular interest in issues related to migrants/ refugees, mobility/migration, border controls, and migrant/citizenship politics