Wilfrid Laurier University Graduate Calendar - 2006/2007
Canadian Excellence

PhD in Global Governance

The objectives of the joint PhD program are:

  • To prepare candidates for a career in teaching and research in the field of global governance, or for the growing range of careers in this area within national governments, international organizations, the non-government sector, and the private sector.
  • To cultivate an interdisciplinary learning environment that develops integrative knowledge of global governance issues from the core disciplines of political science, economics, and history, and related disciplines of geography, global studies, environmental studies, and business, among others.
Additional Information
 
Admission Requirements

Successful candidates must hold a master’s degree with a minimum A- average or equivalent in political science, history, economics, international development studies, international peace studies, globalization studies, environmental studies, or a related field.

Applicants whose native language is not English must furnish evidence of proficiency in English prior to admission, in accordance with University requirements.

 
Program Requirements

The expected time to completion is four years. Course work and two comprehensive examinations are to be completed within the first sixteen months of the program. In the subsequent time students will conduct research and complete their doctoral dissertation. In addition to the course, comprehensive examination, and dissertation requirements described below, students are expected to participate in Research and Doctoral seminars to foster their intellectual and professional development.

Typical progress through the program:

Year 1
Course work (6 term courses, Research and Doctoral
Seminars)
Two comprehensive exams at end of year
Year 2  Optional Internship
Dissertation proposal and defence
Year 3
Dissertation work
Year 4
Dissertation work and defence
 
Course Requirements

All students must complete six courses, including the following three mandatory courses: the “core” course, the “economics” component, and the “history” component. To avoid overlap, selected courses must be approved by the Graduate Officer at the university where the student is registered.

Core Course component:
GV710 Globalization and Global Governance (must be completed in the first term of registration in the program).
Economics component:
IP621 International Trade
History component:
GV720 The History of Global Governance

Students must choose to specialize in one of the five fields of the program. To prepare for the comprehensive exam in that field, they must select at least two courses from their chosen field. Of these two, at least one course  must be a course identified as “core” for that field (marked with an asterisk in the lists below). The sixth course is an elective course.

Not all courses are offered each year and more courses may be available. Consult the respective departments at both institutions for information on available courses in any given year. Consult the respective graduate calendars for full course descriptions.

If selecting the field of Global Political Economy, students must choose at least two courses from among the following offerings at the partner universities:

Wilfrid Laurier University
University of Waterloo
*IP622
PO640
IP641
BU701
BU633
BU643
BU733
EC649
*PSCI689
PSCI631
PSCI683
PSCI688
ECON631
ECON632
ECON660
ECON661
If selecting the field of Global Environment, students must choose at least two courses from among the following offerings at the partner universities:

 Wilfrid Laurier University
University of Waterloo
BU615
*GG673
GG660
GG665
GG668
GG635
IP611
IP612
SY616
*ERS/PSCI604


If selecting the field of Conflict and Security, students must choose at least two courses from among the following offerings at the partner universities:

 

 Wilfrid Laurier University
University of Waterloo
HI616A
HI696I
HI610A
*PSCI659
PSCI636
PSCI655
PSCI681
PSCI687
HIST604
HIST610
HIST611

If selecting the field of Global Justice and Human Rights, students must choose at least two courses from among the following offerings at the partner universities:

 Wilfrid Laurier University
University of Waterloo
*GV750
*GV760
PO650
PO652
PO644
PO671
SY615
*PSCI658
PSCI624
PSCI651
HIST603
HIST626
HIST627
HIST635 R
HIST636

If selecting the field of Multilateral Institutions and Diplomacy, students must choose at least two courses from among the following offerings at the partner universities:

 Wilfrid Laurier University
University of Waterloo
PO670
PO642
PO649
PO641
BU808
*PSCI684
PSCI634
PSCI664
HIST651
HIST632
HIST633
Research and Doctoral Seminars

In addition to the six courses described above, students must also participate in both the Research and Doctoral Seminars during their first year.

PhD Research Seminar (GV701). Advanced study in global governance requires numerate and non-numerate research skills. This seminar will consist of a number of special seminars, colloquia and other presentations focussing on archival research, interview techniques, presentation and communication skills, statistical methods for the social sciences, ethnography, interviewing skills, and related issues in methods and methodology. The course, to be organized by the Program Director (or delegate), will be team taught involving faculty from the units involved in the program at both universities and will be marked on a credit/non-credit basis. Students must maintain continuous registration in this course during the first two terms of the program (fall and winter).

Doctoral Seminar (GV702). The Doctoral Seminar requires attendance year long at departmental colloquia, seminars and related presentations, including public lectures at The Centre for International Governance Innovation, The Academic Council on the United Nations System, and area universities. Credit for the Doctoral Seminar will be assigned by the Program Director in consultation with the student faculty advisor on a credit/non-credit basis. The Seminar is designed to provide structured opportunities for meaningful interaction among students, with faculty and with outside researchers and policymakers, as well as to expose incoming PhD students to the range of opportunities for learning in the area of global governance within the Waterloo community. Students must maintain continuous registration in this course during the first year of the program (3 terms).

Internship

Students may complete a four-to-eight month internship working on global governance issues in the public or private sector, at a research institute, or for a non-governmental organization. The “work-term,” for which no formal credit will be offered, will normally take place during the student’s second year in the PhD program.

Language Requirement

Prior to completion of the third year, students whose doctoral dissertation is concerned with a non-English speaking country or region will be required to demonstrate proficiency in the language of that country. To fulfill the requirement, students will need to demonstrate proficiency in the second language, and may do so by completing designated language courses at either the University of Waterloo or Wilfrid Laurier University. Where there are no courses available, the Program Director will determine the time and method of language assessment, in consultation with the student. The language requirement (GV770) must be met before the doctoral candidate proceeds to the thesis stage.

Comprehensive Exam

Candidates must write comprehensive examinations in two areas within 16 months of starting the program. Normally, students will write comprehensive exams at the end of their first year. The first examination (GV791) will be on Global Governance and will test the breadth and depth of a student’s comprehension of the leading literature. The Program Director will appoint three core faculty members to set the exam questions and mark this first comprehensive exam. The faculty teaching the program core course (GV710) during that particular year must be included among these three faculty members.

For their second area (GV792), students will choose to write a comprehensive examination in one of the five fields of the program. The Program Director, in consultation with the student and the faculty teaching the field core courses, will strike a committee of three faculty members to set the exam questions and to mark the second comprehensive exam. Students can only write an examination in a field if they have completed two courses in that field, one of which must be a “core” course for that field.

Dissertation Requirements and Procedures

Successful completion of comprehensive examinations allows students to progress to the dissertation proposal stage, at which point they should enrol in GV799. The student will normally prepare and present a dissertation proposal to a supervisor before the end of the second year. Normally, students will defend their dissertation proposal before a formal dissertation supervisory committee at the start of the third year or earlier. This defence can take place no later than 30 months after a student’s entry into the programme. A dissertation supervisory committee, normally composed of a supervisor and two core faculty of the Global Governance program, will be formed by the student with the agreement of the Program Director. The candidate will be required to submit a dissertation proposal to the committee. The committee will meet with the student to discuss the proposal. The student will also be required to present the dissertation proposals to the Doctoral Seminar. Upon formal approval, the candidate proceeds to the research and writing of the dissertation. Candidates who fail to satisfy this requirement within the established time frame may be asked to leave the program.

Normally, students should complete and defend the dissertation within four years of starting the program. When a dissertation is completed to the satisfaction of the supervisor, the thesis will be referred to the other members of the supervisory committee. After all committee members are satisfied with the dissertation, including completion of revisions recommended by the committee, an oral defence will be scheduled.

The regulations and procedures at the university where the student is registered will govern both the dissertation and the examination formats and the composition of the dissertation examining committee.

Decisions in the PhD Dissertation Defence

Five decisions are open to the examining committee:

  • Accepted-The dissertation may require typographical and/or minor editorial corrections to be made to the satisfaction of the supervisor.
  • Accepted with modifications-The dissertation requires minor changes in substance or major editorial changes which are to be made to the satisfaction of members of the examining committee designated by the committee. The examining committee's report must include a brief outline of the nature of the changes required and must indicate the time by which the changes should be completed. Normally such changes should be completed within four weeks of the date of the examination.
  • Accepted conditionally-The dissertation requires more substantive changes, but will be acceptable when these changes are made to the satisfaction of those members of the examining committee designated by the committee. The examining committee's report must include a brief outline of the nature of the changes required and the date by which the changes are to be completed.
  • Decision deferred- The dissertation requires modifications of a substantial nature, the need for which makes the acceptability of the thesis questionable. The examining committee's report must contain a brief outline of the modifications expected and should indicate the time by which the changes are to be completed. The revised thesis must be resubmitted for re-examination. Normally, the re-examination will follow the same procedures as for the initial submission except that the display period may be reduced or eliminated at the discretion of the appropriate graduate dean. Normally the same examining committee will serve. A decision to defer is open only once for each candidate.
  • Rejected- The dissertation is rejected. The examining committee shall report the reasons for rejection. A student whose doctoral dissertation has been rejected is required to withdraw from the PhD program.
 

Senate/Editorial Changes

New program approved to commence September 2007; calendar text approved by Senate March 6/07