Wilfrid Laurier University Graduate Calendar - 2011/2012
Canadian Excellence

HI632A
Imperialism and Popular Culture
0.5 Credit

Modern imperialism was a powerful instrument of demographic and cultural change. By consent or coercion peoples from diverse regions and cultures were thrown together and they constructed new societies built upon novel forms of social inequality and conflict. This novel multiracial and multicultural dimension of imperialism also had an impact on metropolitan cultures, and gave rise to a correspondingly new discourse on race, gender, class and national identities. Through readings and discussions, students will explore topics dealing with the relationship between imperialism and popular culture in the period of 1850-1914.

Additional Course Information
Exclusions
HI696M